4-29-19 Ashes and Jasper Update – Chinchilla Introductions

Ashes-Chinchilla-Introductions-2

Today I tried to switch cages, as part of our chinchilla introductions, but Jasper was not liking it! He was really agitated and I ended up not leaving him in the other cage very long. I returned them to their own cages and gave them a dandelion treat for behaving so well.

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Jasper waiting for another dandelion!

 

Ashes-Chinchilla-Introductions
Ashes eating his dandelion

Chinchilla Bonding – What You SHOULD And SHOULD NOT Ever Do!

Chinchiall Bonding

Chinchillas are such a wonderful pet. Most people have no idea how lovable, clever and smart these little animals are. This is not a pet to purchase if you are not a long-term commitment person because a chinchilla has been known to live as long as 35 years. Most chinchilla house pets have a life expectancy of 15-20 years. You want to be sure that this pet will be loved and tended to for all these years. This is a new family member, and it will need regular care and attention.

Proper Chinchilla Bonding Involves:

  • Healthy, Regular Habits for eating, sleeping and playtime.
  • Vet Care when needed.
  • Being Gentle And Calm
  • Let him out to run in a safe room
  • Never Chase your chinchilla!
  • Love Him!

Healthy Habits

Chinchillas really are a special little pet. They have a cheerful disposition and are ready to play upon seeing you. To maintain good health, a chinchilla should be on a regular schedule for eating, sleeping, time out of the cage for playtime, etc. You’ll need to spend at least 2 or more hours daily with your chinchilla. The more time you spend with your pet, the better the pet and your bond.

Vet Care

Chinchillas are low maintenance and have no foul odors if maintained properly. Chins don’t require shots from your vet. It is a good idea to know of a vet that can treat your chin if it should get ill or have an injury.

Chinchilla Bonding 101

When you get your new chinchilla home set the cage up right away with food and water. Then take the chinchilla and place it in the cage. Let the chin explore its new home and take a nap until the evening. Baby chinchillas need reassurance. They need to know you love them and will care for them. They are a baby so treat them like a baby. Do not leave a baby chin alone the first evening when you bring it home. You need to be there when it wakes up, around 6-7pm. Take it out of the cage even if it squawks at you. Pick it up cuddle it and talk softly to let it know everything is ok. If you put on a large overshirt and place the chin inside between your shirts, it will feel secure. When a chin can’t see you, he thinks you don’t know where he is so when hiding in the shirt this provides security but the chinchilla can hear your voice, your breathing, and your heartbeat and can smell you. This creates the chin to get used to you and bond with you. Sit in your favorite chair, watch TV, read, work on the computer. Let your chin run up and down your sleeves, peek out at you from the neckline, run down your back or nap. Do this for one hour daily for three days, and your chin will think you are the greatest thing in the world!! During this time do not let your chin have free run time. When the chin comes out of the cage, you want it to be excited to come out to be with you. If you let your chin run loose before it is bonded to you, it will look forward to coming out of the cage to be free not to be with you. I like to see people wait for 2 to 3 weeks before giving floor runtime. Allow the chin to run on your lap and the sofa but avoid the floor for a couple of weeks.

Ready To Run

When you are ready to let your chin run lose, you need to be sure the area is chin proofed! Be aware of electrical cord and low lying furniture. You can roll up a towel or stuff a pillow in front of dressers etc. so the chin can’t go under where you can’t reach to retrieve him. Beware of lazy boy chairs and the springs underneath. Most people like to let them run in the bathroom it’s small and easy to chin proof or a hallway that you can close doors and block off. SPECIAL NOTES: Be sure to remain seated while letting your chin run around. It is very easy to step on or kneel down on a chin at play. Close the toilet seats, chins look up and only see something to jump up on not knowing the lid is up. Wet chinchillas are susceptible to pneumonia which is life-threatening.

Chewers!!!

Chinchillas are chewers their teeth grow throughout their life and must be worn down so be sure to provide safe, non-toxic branches, pine blocks or pumice stones for your pet. Also, remember when your chin is out playing watch that those electric cords are not accessible because they will chew them! Tape up wires or local hardware stores care plastic tubing with a cut up the side to place your wires in to prevent damage.

Chin Psychology

Chinchillas can be trained to use a litter box and can be trained to go back in their cage upon demand. When you get your new chinchilla to spend a lot of time carrying him around with you. Don’t let him (her) run free until your sure your pet trusts you (about two weeks). During this time when you put your chin back in its cage after the door is closed make a crinkling sound from the treat package then give the chin a treat. When you are ready to let your chin out for free play be sure to give it enough time to really play (at least an hour). Never trick or tease your chin they are smart and have a long-term memory, and they won’t trust you. Never chase your pet to put it in the cage. Chin psychology is needed! Slowly approach your pet then luring it into a corner, casually talk to it, wave your left hand around slowly to get its attention and gently with your other hand scoop up your pet. If you fail, try again but don’t get upset with your pet and frighten it. Dropping a towel or small blanket over your chin puts the chin in darkness, causing him to stop and calm down. Then gently while talking to him pick up the covered chin and gently return him to his cage.

Is that True?

Yes, it is true chinchillas will lick your face or lips as a sign of affection. Yes, they learn their name and come when called if you are always patient and gentle with them. And be sure to rub behind their ears, under their chin, and on their chest because they adore this!

Preventing Chinchilla Environmental Stress

Preventing Chinchilla Environmental Stress

Environmental stress can distress your chinchilla in many different ways. This type of stress results in either behavioral or health concerns. Your pet can experience the following: anti-social behavior that comprises of biting, fighting, spraying urine, fungus, or irritation of the eyes. Your pet can also feel anger towards other chinchillas, biting the fur, gnawing on their cage or even depression.

 

Transition Time

Giving your pet this transition time is essential and very important because if they came from chaotic surroundings, they would have to learn to unwind and if they came from boredom surroundings, they must have time to settle in to handle noise in a timely manner.

Like any other animal, a chinchilla has its own needs that should be addressed, both physically and psychologically. Some extensive research should be made in order to learn the type of food they need to eat, the living conditions they are comfortable with, and more.

Cage

When it comes to a pet chinchilla’s home, make sure that the cage used to keep the chinchilla is big enough for the creature to move around in.

Exercise

Pet chinchillas require regular exercise and recreation. You can place an exercise wheel inside the cage so that the chinchilla can do some physical exercises whenever they feel the need. Pent-up emotions that aren’t released contribute to a stressed chinchilla and will be bad for the little animal’s overall health.

Vacation

Some time away from the cage (not less than 30 minutes a day) is also needed in order to satisfy the animal’s roaming instincts.

Toys

Throw in some chew toys, and your pet chinchilla can keep itself occupied whenever it’s feeling bored. The cage should also be closed up when no one’s around in order to give the chinchilla a sense of security.

Changes

Pet chinchillas don’t adjust really well to change. It’s in their nature.

New living conditions, a new owner, interaction with other chinchillas – all these things need to be done gradually so as not to shock the chinchilla. Sudden or drastic changes in the creature’s environment can easily lead to stress.

A pet chinchilla can feel overwhelmed by what’s going on around them.

Yes, Your Chinchilla Can Die From Stress!

The severe stress that comes with the outpouring of unfamiliar and threatening stimuli may even lead to death. The effects can be gradual, so it’s imperative for any chinchilla owner to monitor the temperament of his pet every chance he gets. Chinchillas that are always hyperactive are the ones prone to stress-related shock.

Chinchillas are creatures of routine, which is why they don’t respond well to new situations and new stimuli.

They have a capacity for coping up and adjusting, but only in small doses. Temperament to change can vary from chinchilla to chinchilla, though health and age can have some influence. Older chinchillas also tend to become more territorial than the younger ones, which is why they have a tendency to bite other chinchillas whenever it feels that its supposed territory is invaded.

To give your pet chinchilla a sense of well-being, you have to introduce new types of stimuli to keep it amused.

Other than chew toys and an exercise wheel, you can place it in front of the television or even play some music. This will be enough to keep your pet entertained. But if your beloved chinchilla still shows signs of boredom and stress, make some adjustments until a change in temperament for the better is made apparent. The key is to be patient and observant about your pet’s behavioral patterns.

How to Discipline Your Pet Chinchilla

How to Discipline Your Pet Chinchilla

Chinchillas are not receptive when you verbally rebuke, hit, or spank them in a fit of anger. The physical actions can cause wounds and abscessing. The physical actions don’t serve a purpose because your pet already has a sensitive body. Chinchillas are already fearful and chewing them out verbally will do nothing but worsen the condition.

The negative verbal actions are not effective at all. Since they are fearful, when their owner treats them as such, they start to feel withdrawn and stressed out. Like a human, they can feel your hostility and anger. In turn, they will become more defensive. You should never blow in their face to punish them. The germs from your air can transmit onto them. They are susceptible to catching a virus, the cold or the flu.

When a chinchilla gets hostile, they will spray urine. They are acting out on their need to withdraw. They still feel defensive, and you may not know why. The withdrawals won’t start until the root cause of it is revealed. When the owner finds out what the problem is, the pet will feel better and can be safe in their habitat. They will definitely make a change when they sense that you are not trying to put them down (degrade).

The Proper Way

The key to being able to discipline a pet chinchilla is actually showing genuine care, compassion and fondness for it. As a response, the chinchilla will be more accepting, calm and obedient. If the exotic pet does happen to do things you’d prefer it not to, a stern warning is sufficient. A firm ‘No’ is the best thing to do to discipline a pet chinchilla. However, it would be wise not to overuse the word as it will push the pet into a sensitive or protective state.

Some owners will really have trouble in getting in the habit of saying ‘No’ as there are chinchillas with no particular personalities. These chinchillas are quite vocal and tend to be harsh, abrasive and/or moody. Chinchillas can and will know when their owner’s mood has settled down and has stopped being hostile. Once they are sure that no harm is intended for them, they will gradually warm up and learn to approach the owner again.

As long as you show your pet genuine love, concern and compassion, they will respond to you with a more accepting reaction. When you give them a warning, do it in a stern, but loving manner. Don’t get in the habit of just saying “no” all the time. Doing this will just take your pet back to square 1. That’s not a good idea. On the other hand, there are some chinchillas that have no personality and tend to be harsh, abrasive or moody. These kinds of pets are very vocal.

Too Withdrawn or Hostile

Should a pet chinchilla be already withdrawn due to negligence or abuse, it is best to have its behavior rehabbed. Rehabilitation is often either instructed or performed by a veterinary expert. As an owner, you will have to be mature about the situation and be extra loving and careful of the exotic animal. Being calm, non-threatening and patient is a must in helping rehabilitate and discipline a pet chinchilla.

When Disciplining Goes Awry

Chinchillas are naturally wary, fearful and fidgety; heightened voice tones and negative vibes could escalate their fear quickly. If treated in such a way, chinchillas will withdraw, avoid the owner, and become extremely stressed out. Like humans, pets like chinchillas are aware of heightened emotions like anger and hostility. In reaction to it, they will become defensive and overprotective. Abusive means used to discipline a chinchilla will only most likely result in a rebellious pet. Chinchillas are known to spray urine at their target when hostile.

Owners who are not abusive (verbally or physically) that get sprayed on don’t often know where such behavior comes from. There is, however, always a root cause for such animal behavior and will most likely have something to do with falling short of the pet’s needs. In the chinchilla’s case, the issue would be safety.

You have to be very mature to take care of an exotic animal such as a chinchila. Justchinchilla that you have to be calm, calm and non-threatening. You also have to have patience because changes just don’t happen immediately. You’ll have to look past it and do your part to help in the transformation. The chinchilla is scared and they may pretend to be threatening, but they’re really not. You must continue to love them, be compassionate, tender, continuously giving them reassurance and lots of warmth. In time, they will change to the loving pet chinchilla you want them to be.

 

Things To Consider If Your Wanting A Chinchilla As A Pet

chinchilla-as-a-pet

So why choose a chinchilla as a pet?

With such a large choice of pets around why choose a chinchilla? Maybe because you perceive them as cute and think they will not take up too much space? Below are the reasons for buying, or not buying, a chinchilla

Reasons you may not want to buy a chinchilla

  • You don’t have time to dedicate to him/her
  • You want an animal you can cuddle and pet – most chinchillas are not keen on being picked up/cuddled
  • You intend to always keep them in the cage and never let them run free (indoors) – chinchillas may be small, but they can be quite energetic, they need to exercise
  • You have small children. While this doesn’t mean you can’t have a chinchilla, they are not considered suitable as pets for children under 12
  • You don’t think you’ll have the time/patience to slowly win their trust – chinchillas can be extremely timid when they do not know you.
  • They don’t come when you call them (and they can’t fetch either).
  • They can’t scare away a burglar.
  • They poop whenever and wherever.
  • They like antique furniture (to chew).

Reasons you may want to buy a chinchilla

  • You have sufficient space for a good size cage, and you have the time to spend with them and supervise their playtimes
  • They are adorable and gentle creatures.
  • They require little attention, but they appreciate attention when shown to them.
  • They keep themselves very clean. In fact, they have no odor.
  • Their fur is so thick that fleas and ticks can’t live on them.
  • They are quiet.
  • They are easy to care for and can be left alone over a weekend.
  • Their food is very inexpensive (only about $1.20 per month).
  • They are nocturnal, so they are ready to play when you get home from work.
  • Many people who are allergic to most animals are not allergic to Chinchillas.
  • They are smart, curious and extremely entertaining.
  • Both you (and any children you have) will understand a small animals nervousness and will be gentle and patient
  • You are looking for a small pet which may enjoy a long lifespan (with some luck and your loving care)
  • You want a pet which will be happy left at home alone all day while you at work
  • You want a reasonably intelligent pet which can think for itself and has its own unique character
  • You have fallen in love with their gentle and inquisitive natures
  • You enjoy watching a chinchilla’s playful antics

Chinchillas and allergies

Most allergic reactions to animals are caused by an immune reaction to a protein found in the saliva, the dander (skin flakes), or the urine of an animal. Of these three, in the case of chinchillas, the urine is most likely to cause a reaction.

It does appear that the vast majority of people will not be allergic to chinchillas. I myself am allergic to cats, dogs, horses, and probably a few other animals as well, however, chinchillas do not appear to affect me – however, I have heard of a few people who do suffer a reaction. The hay (which the chinchillas should be supplied with), or their dust baths may also cause an allergic reaction.

Points to consider if you may be allergic:

  • Before buying a chinchilla try handling one. If you suffer an allergic reaction then you know it will affect you
  • Use chinchilla bath sand instead of dust to decrease airborne dust
  • Use hay cubes rather than loose hay to reduce airborne allergens
  • When buying loose hay, look for hay that says ‘Dust Extracted.’
  • Consider using a wire-bottomed cage with a pull out litter pan rather than have a cage with a solid bottom. Instead of the dust and allergens sitting in the bottom of the cage where the chinchillas will disturb them, they will collect below the cage where they will be undisturbed
  • Use newspaper in the cage/litter tray instead of wood shavings

 

Chinchillas and other animals

Many people who own chinchillas also keep cats or dogs and experience no problems. However, chinchillas can become stressed by other animals, for example, dogs nosing around the cage and barking at them, or cats trying to reach them. You need to judge for yourself how existing pets will react.

While it may not be a good idea to have dogs or cats in the room while a chinchilla is running free, many chinchillas will enjoy the company of a guinea pig.

Having said this, it has been known for other animals, e.g., dogs rabbits, etc. to pass on a disease they are carrying to chinchillas. While the disease may not affect the other animal, it can affect the more sensitive chinchilla. One example of such a disease is Bordatella.

 

Chinchilla Q & A

What do chins eat?
What other treats could I give my chin?
What type of cage should I get?
What is in a chinnie’s cage?
How much can I expect to spend on my first chin?
What about exercise?
Can I use a ferret leash on my chin?
What do you have against those exercise balls, anyway?
Can a chinchilla really die from being too hot?
What’s this I hear about chinnies and water?
What if my chinchilla gets abnormally dirty or gets wet by accident?

What do chins eat?
In all honesty, it depends on whom you ask. Different chin owners feed their chins different diets. A better question for me to answer is what do our chins eat! Our chins are given a constant supply of Mazuri pellets to eat throughout the day. They also have alfalfa cubes to chew on, though none of our chins seem to be particularly fond of cubed hay. In the evenings, they are given 1/2 teaspoon of rolled oats, a generous helping of timothy hay, and a treat. Treats can be a variety of things. We generally have raisins, bite-sized shredded wheat squares, horse cookies, and almonds. Once a week, each chin gets a small piece of dried papaya, rosehips, and a chewable Vitamin C. These are given in place of the traditional treats. Occasionally, we give Nutri-Cal in addition to a treat. Pregnant females are given calf manna, raspberry leaves, and an extra bottle full of cranberry juice and water.

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What other treats could I give my chin?
Dried cranberries, plain Cheerios, dried apples, prunes, a half of a fresh or frozen grape, very small pieces of fresh or dehydrated banana, unsalted peanut in the shell, uncooked pasta… The list goes on! Remember, everything in moderation.

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What type of cage should I get?
We have several different styles and sizes of cages for our chins. We started off with the wrong type of cage for our first chin. Of course, this can easily happen when you buy a cage from a pet store that has no real knowledge of what a chin needs. After doing even more research on chinchillas and cages, we quickly stopped using the original cage and got a new one. As a general rule, you should use a cage with wire flooring no bigger than ½” by ½,” if you have wire flooring at all. We recommend cages be at least 16″ (width) by 16″ (depth) by 16″ (height) for one chin. However, even bigger is definitely better! Having a slide-out pan can also save a great deal of time and prevents your chins from being in direct contact with the bedding or litter. If you are using a wire cage, it is important to provide solid surfaces for your chin to rest. This can be done with pine shelves and ledges or marble tiles, which also provide an excellent means for your chin to cool down. We recommend the  Midwest Deluxe Critter Nation Many people find that they can build their own wonderful chinchilla cages from a combination of melamine, pine, and wire. We just haven’t the time nor the energy.

Our Chinchilla Cages

 

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What is in a chinnies cage?
Once again, that depends on the chin. We use and recommend Choco Nose No Drip Top-fill water bottles, and Living World Lock and Crock Dish. Each cage has a pine box for hiding and chewing. Each of our chins has pine blocks, lava rocks, pumice, and a few other toys to chew on. Chewing is very important for a chin’s health, as it helps to keep their teeth trim. Many of our chins have their own special stuffed Booda buddy. A few of the chins have cuttlebone. They all have ledges and levels to add to the fun of their cage. Chins like to jump and climb! Bedding or litter is also necessary. We use Living World Pine Shavings, which are inexpensive, softer on chin feet, and safe.

 

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How much can I expect to spend on my first chin?
These amounts are low approximations for essential chinchilla supplies for one month. The actual price will vary depending upon the amount spent for any shipping and handling charges, buying in bulk to save future expenses, electing to purchase for different places or purchase different supplies, etc. This also does NOT include the cost of the chinchilla! You should expect to spend between $75 and $500 for a chinchilla, depending on color, background, age, etc.  Please consider adopting a chinchilla from a rescue rather than a pet store!

  • Cage
  •  Bedding
  • Water bottles
  • Food dish
  •  Food
  •  Hay
  •  Treats
  •  Toys
  • Bathhouse – Kaytee Chinchilla Bath House
  • Dust – Kaytee Chinchilla Dust

Your approximate total cost would be in the area of $181 for supplies alone.

Other items you may wish to purchase right away or could need in the future are listed below.

  • Ledges
  • Exercise Wheel
  •  Cuttlebone
  •  Nutri-Cal
  • Chewable Vitamin C
  • Calf Manna Supplement
  •  Oats
  •  Brush
  • Pine house
  • Chin-Chiller

Chinchillas are not inexpensive animals to care for. A great deal of time and money must be invested to ensure chinnies have happy, healthy homes and proper care.

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What about exercise? Can I use a ferret leash on my chin?
While we would never use a leash on a chinchilla, chins do require exercise. Large cages with enough room to run around and play will certainly help, but nothing beats having playtime! Chin-proofing a room is necessary before any chinchilla is allowed to run around. Chinchillas are chewers. This goes for baseboards, electrical wires, furniture, and on and on. We’ve found that the most convenient way to get our chins to exercise is by allowing them an hour or two to run around the bathroom every evening. Chin-proofing a bathroom is fairly easy. Clean up is much more simple when the carpet isn’t involved. Urine can easily be mopped up or wiped up, or a litter pan can be placed in your chin’s “favorite spot.”

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What do you have against those exercise balls, anyway?
We do not recommend the use of small animal exercise balls, such as the Giant Kritter Krawlers. It has been our experience that the lids on these come off easily, even when they have been securely locked into position. We have had chinchillas find their way out of these exercise balls on two separate occasions. If you must use these to give your chinchillas exercise, please use masking tape to prevent the lids from moving. Also, these Giant Kritter Krawlers can cause a chin to over-heat. Remember to take your chin out of the ball at least every fifteen minutes to prevent overheating and possible death. Another disadvantage to these exercise balls is that the chinchilla is trapped inside with droppings and urine. Feces and urine and become embedded in the chin’s coat. Regular and thorough sanitizing is necessary to prevent these exercise balls from harboring bacteria.

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Can a chinchilla really die from being too hot?
Yes. Unlike humans and most other mammals, chinchillas cannot regulate their body temperature. Ideal temperatures are between 45º and 70º F with low humidity. Cages should be kept out of direct sunlight as well as direct draft. We keep our air conditioning set at 70º F during most months, as Arizona tends to have mainly hot months and short winter periods. Another way to keep your chin cool is to freeze smooth rocks and place them in the cages for your chinnies to lean against. This acts better than a frozen water bottle, as there will not be any condensation. You can also try unglazed floor tiles, smooth marble slabs, and chimineas.

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What’s this I hear about chinnies and water?
Chinchillas and water DO NOT mix! It is fine for chins to drink water, of course, but it is not a good idea to have chinnies around an open water source. Chinchilla fur can be ruined by water. This is why we recommend the water bottles with no-drip valves. Instead of taking traditional baths, chins use special dust to keep clean. You can use chinchilla bath houses to keep the particles confined while chins are rolling around and having fun in the dust. We’ve found that these narrow entrances make a few of our chins a bit nervous. Instead, we use a clear, deep, plastic container with a lid that can be placed on top when the chinchillas are done bathing. This can be very messy, so we don’t recommend allowing chins to bathe around electrical equipment, such as televisions, computers, stereos, etc. Chins should be given access to dust baths approximately three or four times a week. You might consider placing the dust bath in the cage for a 15-minute period. We like to give them access to the dust bath during play time, as this takes place in the bathroom and, again, allows for easy clean-up. Having constant access to the dust bath can cause dry skin.

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What if my chinchilla gets abnormally dirty or gets wet by accident?
Generally, anything in chinchilla fur will come out with the help of numerous dust baths. If, for example, your chin’s fur gets sticky from Nutri-Cal or takes on the color from a dyed toy, you can use unscented baby wipes to help clean them up. Take the dirty fur between a folded baby wipe and rub. Afterward, either give the chin access to a dust bath or rub dust on the wet spots by rubbing the dust into the fur.

If your chin has gotten wet and the water has soaked through to the skin, you will need to help dry the fur to prevent fungus. Since chinchilla fur is so dense, the fur will not dry completely on its own. Use towels and a drying set on cool to prevent overheating.


My Chinchilla Schedule

Chinchillas are very much creatures of habit. Chinchillas like routines and tend to be a little more happy and relaxed in an environment where a routine has been established. Routines also help chin owners to ensure that all of their duties have been performed in regards to chinnie care. We have set up a list of our daily, weekly, and monthly schedules in regards to our chinchillas. Generally, there are one or two days a week that the chinnies do not get external exercise (playtime), but these days are determined by our plans for the week and can change from week to week.

I no longer have rescued chins. I am down to just one. This is the schedule a friend of mine gave me and has been adopted by many breeders. So if you’re going to have multiple chinchillas, this schedule may help you.

NOTE: Before putting two Chinchilla’s together, please thoroughly read Introducing Chinchillas!


DAILY


Monday

Check water levels (Morning and evening)
Playtime for Clyde, Z, and Zeus (6:30-7:30)
Playtime for Koontz (7:30-8:00)
Fresh timothy hay in every cage (8:00)
Playtime for Avra (8:00-8:30)
Playtime for Henna upstairs (8:00-8:30)
One treat per chin (8:30)
Playtime for Krishna and Radha (8:30-9:00)
Change out pellets and give 1/2 teaspoon of oats per chin (9:00)
Playtime for Sage (9:00-9:30)
Playtime for Bonnie, Hera, and Kalli (9:30-10:00)
Playtime for Harold (10:00-11:00)

Tuesday

Check water levels (Morning and evening)
Dust bathes during the first 15 minutes of each play time
Playtime for Clyde, Z, and Zeus (6:30-7:30)
Playtime for Koontz (7:30-8:00)
Fresh timothy hay in every cage (8:00)
Playtime for Avra (8:00-8:30)
Playtime for Henna upstairs (8:00-8:30)
One treat per chin (8:30)
Playtime for Krishna and Radha (8:30-9:00)
Change out pellets and give 1/2 teaspoon of oats per chin (9:00)
Playtime for Sage (9:00-9:30)
Playtime for Bonnie, Hera, and Kalli (9:30-10:00)
Playtime for Harold (10:00-11:00)

Wednesday

Check water levels (Morning and evening)
Clean all cages (Done during each chinnies’ play time)
Playtime for Clyde, Z, and Zeus (6:30-7:30)
Playtime for Koontz (7:30-8:00)
Fresh timothy hay in every cage (8:00)
Playtime for Avra (8:00-8:30)
Playtime for Henna upstairs (8:00-8:30)
One treat per chin (8:30)
Playtime for Krishna and Radha (8:30-9:00)
Change out pellets and give 1/2 teaspoon of oats per chin (9:00)
Playtime for Sage (9:00-9:30)
Playtime for Bonnie, Hera, and Kalli (9:30-10:00)
Playtime for Harold (10:00-11:00)

Thursday

Check water levels (Morning and evening)
Playtime for Clyde, Z, and Zeus (6:30-7:30)
Playtime for Koontz (7:30-8:00)
Fresh timothy hay in every cage (8:00)
Playtime for Avra (8:00-8:30)
Playtime for Henna upstairs (8:00-8:30)
One treat per chin (8:30)
Playtime for Krishna and Radha (8:30-9:00)
Change out pellets and give 1/2 teaspoon of oats per chin (9:00)
Playtime for Sage (9:00-9:30)
Playtime for Bonnie, Hera, and Kalli (9:30-10:00)
Playtime for Harold (10:00-11:00)

Friday

Check water levels (Morning and evening)
Playtime for Clyde, Z, and Zeus (6:30-7:30)
Playtime for Koontz (7:30-8:00)
Fresh timothy hay in every cage (8:00)
Playtime for Avra (8:00-8:30)
Playtime for Henna upstairs (8:00-8:30)
One treat per chin (8:30)
Playtime for Krishna and Radha (8:30-9:00)
Change out pellets and give 1/2 teaspoon of oats per chin (9:00)
Playtime for Sage (9:00-9:30)
Playtime for Bonnie, Hera, and Kalli (9:30-10:00)
Play time for Harold (10:00-11:00)

Saturday

Thoroughly clean water bottles and food bowls (Done during the day)
Check water levels (Morning and evening)
Clean all cages (Done during each chinnies’ play time)
Playtime for Clyde, Z, and Zeus (6:30-7:30)
Playtime for Koontz (7:30-8:00)
Fresh timothy hay in every cage (8:00)
Playtime for Avra (8:00-8:30)
Playtime for Henna upstairs (8:00-8:30)
One treat per chin (8:30)
Playtime for Krishna and Radha (8:30-9:00)
Change out pellets and give 1/2 teaspoon of oats per chin (9:00)
Playtime for Sage (9:00-9:30)
Playtime for Bonnie, Hera, and Kalli (9:30-10:00)
Playtime for Harold (10:00-11:00)

Sunday

Check water levels (Morning and evening)
Check weights (Done in the early evening)
Dust bathes during the first 15 minutes of each play time
Playtime for Clyde, Z, and Zeus (6:30-7:30)
Playtime for Koontz (7:30-8:00)
Fresh timothy hay in every cage (8:00)
Playtime for Avra (8:00-8:30)
Playtime for Henna upstairs (8:00-8:30)
One treat per chin (8:30)
Playtime for Krishna and Radha (8:30-9:00)
Change out pellets and give 1/2 teaspoon of oats per chin (9:00)
Playtime for Sage (9:00-9:30)
Playtime for Bonnie, Hera, and Kalli (9:30-10:00)
Playtime for Harold (10:00-11:00)

 


WEEKLY

Generally, we give our chinchillas a bit of Nutrical (about the size of a pea) once or twice a week. We also throw out alfalfa cubes and replace them with fresh cubes a few times a week, depending on temperature and humidity. Cages are cleaned at least once a week. Chew blocks are given as needed. Cuttlebone is replaced as necessary. Pine shavings are cleaned from around the cages often. Any urine on the shelves and ledges are cleaned as needed.


MONTHLY

Once a month, we take the cages outside and give them a thorough scrub down. Without the chins being inside them, of course! Once a month, stuffed toys are washed. Obviously, these toys are washed more often if they have become soiled.

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Meet My Rescued Chinchillas

 

Males

CLYDE

 


HAROLD

harold the chinchilla


Z


KRISHNA


KOONTZ


Females

Bonnie


Hera

 

hera our chinchilla as a pet


Avra

 


Radha


Kalli

Kahli our chinchilla


Background Information

Krishna & Radha

The Story:

Krishna is one of the most popular deities throughout India. Krishna’s consort, Radha, is equally loved amongst the people of India. Krishna is considered to be the eighth incarnation of the god Vishnu. According to legend, Krishna was also heroic. He is alleged to have defeated numerous dragons and monsters, and, as predicted, he killed his half-uncle, the tyrannical King Kamsa.

While Krishna is divine, Radha was human. Radha was a cowherdess who once experienced divine love with Krishna. After they were separated, Radha yearned for reunion. Her longing is a metaphor for the human soul longing for union with the divine. The final reunion symbolizes the bliss of salvation.

 

Avra

Their History:

After Avra’s initial quarantine, an attempt was made to place her with some of the other girls (Bonnie, Hera, and Kalli). Unfortunately, Bonnie and Avra just could not get along. Avra was given her own cage, just above the girls’ cage, with a lovely pink hammock. She thoroughly enjoyed the single life.

 

Z and Mabel 

Their History:

Mabel lived most of her young life helping her mother to raise her offspring. She has a very sweet temperment and loves being around other chinchillas. Unfortunately, Mabel’s first mate, Sage, passed away in December of 2015.

Z is a very docile chin, always preferring to let the other chins be dominant. He lived with Clyde and Zeus very happily for several months.

 


Having a chinchilla as a pet is a huge responsibility, but oh so rewarding!

You may also want to read our post “Chinchilla Care Sheet