Violet Chinchilla

violet-female

History of the Violet Chinchilla

Extract Taken from – Modern Chinchilla Fur Farming,
By – Willis D Parker, 1975

Known as the Sullivan Violet or Lavender.

WHITE-VIOLET chinchillaThis herd was originally in Rhodesia in about 1967 and in subsequent years, several of the mutant animals died when they were about half grown.
The rancher, sent them back to Dr. Caraway, of Fort Worth, Texas, who was secretary of MCBA. They appeared to be of two different shades of Violet or Lavender with quite a nice fur. They were encouraged to continue their mutant program, and send more casualties when they occurred. They next went to South Africa and were subsequently purchased by Lloyd Sullivan of Oakhurst, California. He has now ( 1975 ) had them in the United States for three to four years and had considerably improved their appearance. They have a beautiful white belly. They are Lavender or Violet in color. They have a pinkish, Violet appearance. They are well veiled and have a nice texture, and the underfur is the same color as the tipping. They have a thin, pale, lavender bar. At present, it seems to be the most promising of all the recessive mutations.

Working with the Violet

violet-wrap-chinchillaWhen you purchase your first Violet, you should automatically notice the difference in the strength of the fur. Even some of the best Violets that I have seen do just not have the density. But then, when venturing into breeding mutations, you tend to get used this problem. The fur is usually very fine and silky, and this makes it soft. However, what you do want to see in your violets, is the beautiful, distinctive white belly fur, that is usually such blue-white, that it glows at you.

Violets do come in different color phases – light, medium, and dark. Personally, I prefer the darker color phased Violets. You can, however, make your Violets even darker, by breeding a Touch of Velvet Violet. This is when you cross Black Velvet into your Violets and give them an even darker veiling. The most obvious way to tell the difference between a dark color phased Violet, and a Touch of Velvet Violet is by checking for the stripes on the front paws of the animal. Remember that any Chinchilla that has Black Velvet in it will have the stripes running diagonally across the front paws.

It is also possible to breed the recessive Violet to other dominant Mutations and produce different amazing effects by breeding Violet cross mutations. For example one of the most unusual looking colored chinchillas, that I have seen is the Violet / Beige Cross. This has also been described as the ‘Pearl’ Chinchilla. The reason being is that it reminds you of the ‘Mother of Pearl’ effect. Being that sometimes you look and the animal appears to be Violet with a hue of Beige, then you will look again and find the animal looks Beige with a hue of Violet. As unusual as this mutation may be, I have not yet viewed one that I would consider to be a quality animal. The combination of breeding the soft, fine fur of a Violet to a soft-furred Beige, carrying Violet, tends to mean that the offspring from this combination has very poor fur quality and also appear not to grow large, remaining at not much more than one pound in weight when reaching adulthood.

One of the other most distinctive looking mutations that have been derived from crossing with other dominant colors is the Violet/White cross. Again this animal is very exciting to view, being that most look like Mosaics, except that where the usual Mosaic would have grey patches, on a Violet/White cross, the colored patches showing against the White are Violet in color. The fur quality of these Mutations if bred from a good quality white does not appear to be so softly textured as that of the Beige/Violet Cross.

You can also work with using your recessives by breeding them to other recessives, but this does require a lot of space and many animals to reach a determined goal of a specific double recessively genes Chinchilla. For example, it is possible to work with Violet and Charcoal and breed an animal that due to the wrap around the color of the charcoal, turns out to be Violet all the way around, without the white belly fur. This similar effect can also be obtained by working the Violet with Ebony as well.

The only problems that you will encounter, maybe the loss in size and fur quality in subsequent litters when working with so many mutations. It is also possible that after many generations you can blank out some of the Violet colorings in the animals. It is therefore important to always follow the rule of breeding each subsequent generation with quality standards wherever possible, to keep the size and quality of your Violet lines.

How to breed your very own Violet, White Cross Chinchilla

1st – Violet bred to White – this combination will produce 50 % Standard Violet carriers and 50 % White Violet carriers. You need a White Violet Carrier
2nd – Breed the White Violet Carrier to a nonrelated Violet – this combination will produce the following offspring – 25 % Standard Violet carriers, 25 % White Violet carriers, 25 % Violets, and 25 % Violet/White Crosses.

Enjoy working with the Violet!

How To Tell If A Chinchilla Is Pregnant

How To Tell If A Chinchilla Is Pregnant

To the inexperienced eye, it is not always possible to detect whether a female Chinchilla is pregnant or not. Unless you were actually there at the time of mating, then it is difficult to detect and to work out when she will be due to litter. Hopefully, the following information will help to give you a clue as to whether she is definitely pregnant or not.

Possible Signs of Mating

How To Tell If A Chinchilla Is PregnantIf you have more than one male Chinchilla, you will find it fairly easy to ascertain whether a female is in heat or not. Of course, if you have more than one female, you will need to try to find out which female it is! Each male will appear excited and quite possible will start ‘chirping,’ while trying to mate with his prospective partner, even though she may not be in heat! Sometimes it is a lot easier if you just have one pair, to note that a mating has just taken place. It is always useful to count 111 days after you have seen your Chinchillas mating, as this will be the date that is she due to litter. If however, you note the pair mating again the following month, then it is safe to assume that she did not get pregnant the previous month and once again count on 111 days and mark it on your calendar. If you do not see mating again within a month or so, after the initial mating it is then very possible that your female is already one month into her pregnancy. After the mating, the telltale signs are, as follows…

  • Small pieces of fluff and fur on the floor of and under the cage.
  • The copulation plug or ‘ stopper’ as it is sometimes called may be found, but not always. This is a small waxy, white looking plug that after a successful mating the female will release, but sometimes this can get lost in debris under the cage. Or even eaten by the female.
  • If you are lucky enough to be nearby at the time of mating, when the male has finished, you will hear him let off a ‘hiccuping’ cry that you may never have heard before. After mating, is the only time that you will hear this unusual cry being emitted by the male.

Signs of Pregnancy

HowToTellIfAChinchillaIsPregnant-Pregnancy is normally difficult to detect before the female has reached 60 days. Then it is still not always that easy when you are not sure what you are looking for and if it is the first time that you have tried to check! Remember when checking your female, whom you believe to be pregnant, that she should be handled carefully, given good support to her whole body and be careful that she does not become stressed by the whole procedure. Listed below are some of the signs of pregnancy to look out for …

1. The nipples may appear pinker in color than usual and after approximately 60 days will become enlarged and longer in appearance. This should be noticeable by blowing the fur around the nipple area. After around 90 days or so into the pregnancy the nipples will change to red in color and will have doubled in length.
2. On or after around the first 60 days of your Chinchillas pregnancy, the abdomen will feel full and curved.
3. After 90 days or so, it is also possible, upon careful handling to feel the babies moving inside her. This is not always easy, especially if your female happens only to be having one baby. However, sometimes you can distinctly feel a ‘kick’ from one of her babies. Some experienced breeders can even detect how many babies a female is carrying. But I would not suggest that you feel around her stomach too much, as it could cause distress to the female and if handled incorrectly could even cause problems with the pregnancy.
4. You can also weigh your female monthly. The first month of the pregnancy you will not notice hardly any weight gain. But after the initial 30 days or so, you should start to notice a steady weight gain. Normally she will have gained approximately 50 grams or so by the time she reaches 60 days into her pregnancy. Obviously, her weight will keep on increasing until she finally litters. The amount of weight she puts on will obviously depend on how many babies she has grown inside of her. A good weight gain of perhaps 150 to 200 grams will possibly mean multiple litters.

Good luck with the little ones when they arrive!

How To Handle A Chinchilla Mom And Chinchilla Baby (Kit)

How To Handle A Chinchilla Mom And Chinchilla Baby

Once you have confirmed that your chinchilla is pregnant, provide that chinchilla with plenty of extra hay, food, and water. Expectant mothers will drink and eat quite a bit more, so it is imperative that more food and water are at the chinchilla’s disposal. Some people will stop giving calf mana to there chinchillas once they know they are pregnant. People have reported that calf mana can cause larger babies and therefore causes the mother to have a more difficult birth. This could result in the baby getting stuck in the birth canal.

A chinchilla’s vagina opens before the chinchilla gives birth. Each chinchilla is different, so this can occur a week before she delivers, a few days before she delivers, or on the day of delivery. If you do not know your chinchilla’s due date, it is best to remove the chinchilla from her partner once you see she has opened. This will prevent breedback from occurring.

Breedback is when the female chinchilla has delivered her litter, and the male will breed her again. This causes a lot of stress on the chinchilla’s body because she is feeding and looking after kits on the outside, and nurturing kits on the inside. Breedback takes a lot out of a chinchilla mother. If breedback does occur, make sure the chinchilla gets a long break before she is put back into breeding.

After the female chinchilla has given birth her vagina remains opens for approximately ten days. Once her vagina has closed the male chinchilla can be put back in with her to help raise the kits. Monitor the female and male closely to ensure nothing negative happens. Also, monitor the female’s genitalia after she has given birth. Sometimes females can get infections, so watch for any discolored discharge or bad odor. If you see any signs of infection, the chinchilla will have to be taken to the vet for antibiotics.

HowToHandleAChinchillaMomAndChinchillaBaby

Chinchilla Births

If you’re lucky enough you will get to witness the birth of your chinchilla’s kits. People often miss the birthing because it usually occurs in the early morning. However, chinchillas can give birth at any time during the day or night. If you have a cage with multiple levels, the chinchilla will go to the very bottom level to give birth; this usually happens about a week before the birthing. When the time to deliver comes, your chinchilla will begin to start stretching. She will walk around the cage stretching her back legs.

Once the contractions start your chinchilla may be sitting on all four legs or standing on her back legs. If the chinchilla is having contractions while on her back two legs she will stand straight up when having the contraction. She will then go back to sitting on her back two legs. If the chinchilla is on all four legs having contractions, she will lean forward during the contractions. You may even be able to see the sides of your chinchilla become really indented during each contraction. It is not uncommon for chinchillas to grind their teeth while in labor, some will even let out squeaks of pain.

Once the water breaks your chinchilla’s stomach may become soaked with water, however, this doesn’t always occur. Sometimes when the water breaks the water will just go into the shavings, and there will be no visible signs of the water had broken.

You may notice your chinchilla monitoring her vagina during the process of her labor. Once the chinchilla is ready to deliver a kit, she will bend down and pull the kit out with her teeth. She will then proceed to clean the kit off. Sometimes with first-time mothers, they become a little eager to clean their baby. This can sometimes result in the kit getting injured. If you notice your chinchilla becoming a little too eager with her kits, you can remove the kit and start to dry it off yourself.

In the case of multiple litters, the mother chinchilla may start to have contractions right after delivering her first kit. She may then ignore the kit that was just born and move on to begin delivering the second kit. If you see this happening, remove the kit and start to dry it off until the mother chinchilla can focus her attention on it.

The mother chinchilla will deliver an afterbirth, and in most cases, this signifies the end of the birthing. However, there have been cases where the chinchilla is not finished. Chinchilla’s have two uterine horns and can hold kits in both horns. The afterbirth may just be the ending of one of the uterine horns.

Once your chinchilla has finished giving birth, it is best to pick her up and check her stomach to make sure there are no other chinchillas inside her. By gentle pushing her stomach, she should feel squishy, but if her stomach still feels hard and you can still feel lumps, she still has kits inside her. Give the chinchilla some time to see if she has the kits on her own. If her labor has stopped completely, she should be taken to a vet. Some chinchillas can go hours between kits, and some will have one right after the other.

If a kit becomes stuck in the birth canal, you can gently try to ease the kit out with the chinchilla’s contractions, *most kits often die when they become stuck, and you have to work them out*. This should only be done if you are confident in handling your chinchilla under stress. If you are unable to get the kit out, the chinchilla needs to be taken to a vet. The faster you get the kit out, the better chance you have of saving the mother chinchilla. Kits that becomes stuck are fatal to the mother chinchilla. Chinchillas will bleed during delivery, but not a whole lot of blood will be noticeable. If you notice your chinchilla is bleeding quite a bit and continues to bleed after she has finished delivering all the kits, she needs to be taken to a vet.

HowToHandleAChinchillaMomAndChinchillaBaby

Chinchilla Mother’s Milk

It is always best to find out if the mother’s milk is coming in before you decide to hand feed any kit. Finding out if the mother chinchilla’s milk has come in can be tricky if your chinchilla does not like to be held. Make sure to hold the chinchilla firmly so it cannot get loose. You then gently spread the fur covering the teat, you should be able to visibly see an elongated red/pink teat. Gently squeeze the teat at the base of the chinchilla’s skin in a downward motion, this should cause milk to come out of the end of the teat.

Do not worry if on the first day no milk appears to have come in. Chinchilla mother’s milk usually does not come in on the first day. To help the mother’s milk to come in you can put a water bottle, consisting of half water and half unsweetened cranberry juice, into the cage. Make sure you provide the chinchilla with a water bottle with just water in it as well. During the first week of life, make sure you weigh the kit often to make sure the mother is providing them with enough milk. Kits should gain 2-5 grams per day.

HowToHandleAChinchillaMomAndChinchillaBaby

Hand Feeding Kits

Only start hand feeding if it is absolutely necessary. Hand feeding should take place every 2 hours for the first week the kit is born. You can get away with 3 hours at night. Then increase the time between hand feedings by an hour of each additional week. Week 2 feed every 3 hours, week three every 4 hours, etc.. At night you can increase the time by an hour as well. You may have to go back to hand feeding every two hours if the kit is not gaining.

This is what I used while hand feeding, but it may have to be modified to each specific kit.

When starting to get a kit to hand feed gently hold the kit in one hand in an upright position. Place your fingers over the legs to prevent the kit from getting loose. Try not to hold the kit too tightly, just enough so it cannot get away from you. Then, place the syringe on the lips in the kit, and allow one drop to sit on the kits lips. The kit will then lick the drop off its lips. Continue to do this until the kit gets the hang of hand feeding.

You do not want to rush the kit into hand feeding because you then run the risk of aspiration. You will know the kit has aspirated if it starts to make a coughing noise and milk starts to come out of the kit’s nose. Don’t be alarmed if this happens, because chances are it will occur when your kit is starting out at hand feeding. If this happens put the kit’s body into your hand (make sure you support the neck) and bring the kit up to your body, then swing the kit down towards your legs. This will force out any fluid remaining in the lungs. If not a lot of milk has entered the lungs of your kit then the kit should be able to cough it out by itself, just make sure you wipe off the milk coming out of the nose to prevent it from going back into the nose.

Hand fed kits should be weighed at every feeding during the first week. It’s much slower for weight gains in hand-fed babies. This is because it takes them a while to figure out the whole hand-feeding process. If your hand feeding a kit and the kit is not gaining any weight and has started to lose weight, you need to start hand feeding more often. If the kit is not gaining and not losing you can try to feed them more often. During the first week of life, kits should be taking anywhere from 1 – 3 full syringes. One syringe equals one cc.

HowToHandleAChinchillaMomAndChinchillaBaby

Recipe for Hand Feeding

  • One can of goat’s milk (if goat’s milk cannot be found you can use evaporated milk)
  • One can of water
  • One tablespoon of live active bacteria culture yogurt
  • One tablespoon of dried baby rice cereal
  • Two drops of light corn syrup (I didn’t use this in my mixture because it gave the kit diarrhea)

This mixture only stays good for two days. You can freeze the rest in ice cube trays

Ebony Chinchiilla

Baby Ebony Chinchilla

I’ve have had many people contact me confused with how to work with breeding the Ebony Chinchilla.

So the following information is dedicated to you!

 

EBONY
Adjective – meaning – Intensely Black
— Source: Oxford Dictionary
Dark Ebony Chinchilla
Photo Credit: @lilaschinchilla

 

Bowens Chinchilla Ranch

The Ebony was developed by Bowens Chinchilla Ranch in the USA. In 1982, when the Ebony was a relatively new Mutation to the Chinchilla world, it was thought to be a DOMINANT, with regards to breeding and the genetics of the mutation.

The Early Years

In 1946 Ed and Marge Bowen purchased their first pair of chinchillas for $3,200 (at that time a brand new Cadillac cost $800!) They both really enjoyed raising these little animals and the second pair of chinchillas followed soon after that. Ed and Marge purchased several small herds throughout the years, and it wasn’t long before the chinchillas outgrew their basement.

Son and daughter-in-law, Bud and Joan, were brought into the business and three chinchilla barns were built in 1959. Each barn measured 60′ by 26′. By this time the ranch had grown to about 2,000 animals. Ed became president of Empress, the national organization for commercial chinchilla ranchers, and both he and his son, Bud, judged many chinchilla shows.

Enter the Neubauers

Gary and Margot Neubauer started raising chinchillas in 1968. They were very successful. In 1971 they won Grand Show and Reserve Grand Show against the toughest competition Southern California could muster. Ed Bowen suffered a stroke in 1972, and Gary Neubauer was brought in to manage Bowen’s Chinchillas. Sadly, shortly after that Ed passed away.

Bud Bowen became Empress president in 1976, an office which he retained for four years. Besides guiding the national breeders’ organization, he formed the Chinchilla Industry Council. The CIC is an international organization that is still instrumental in fighting many of the airline regulations as well as animal rights extremists.

Bud turned over the reigns of the ranch operation to Gary. Gary became a partner in the ranch and several years later, the sole owner of Bowen’s Chinchilla Ranch.

In the year 2000, Gary and Margot moved the chinchillas to Anza, California. The Anza facility is much larger than the old ranch and could house many thousands of animals in a climate that is very well suited for chinchilla ranching. Anza is located in a desert mountain area that is above 4,000′. Because of the dry air, evaporative coolers can handle the summer heat. In the winter months, propane heaters ensure that the breeders and weaners at kept at no less than 60 degrees. Underground earth-tubes provided fresh air at moderate temperatures, even in the hottest summer months and the coldest winter months.

Ebony Mutation

At the time, the Ebony mutation was described as follows – The HOMOZYGOUS animal ( full Ebony ) is dark to extra dark from Brownish Black to Jet Black. The HETEROZYGOUS ( Ebony carrier ) animal has a distinct agouti pattern and a grotzen area with lighter sides and darker belly fur.

The source of the information in the above paragraph is taken from ‘Modern Chinchilla Farming,’ by Willis D Parker.

From The Experts

Ebony Chinchilla Show Ribbons

The advice that is given in this article, from the book mentioned above is the same information that was passed on from the original breeders of the Ebony Chinchillas!  These Ebony Chinchillas are from some of the best show winning lines in the USA, and therefore I am taking the breeders advice and acting upon it to keep the quality of the Ebony lines.

The genetic information is therefore as follows – The Ebony is a CUMULATIVE RECESSIVE. This means that as the color is bred together, the color gets darker and stronger with each generation.

The animal was originally thought to be dominant because sometimes the first generation offspring have a white belly and when mated to a Standard would produce white bellied offspring. The problem is that any animal with a possible Ebony gene can produce brown bellied offspring, which obviously is not desirable. Several breeders have had herds ruined because of this.

The most interesting point is that when working with the Ebony you can also have the following occur – If two HOMOZYGOUS Ebony Chinchillas are bred together, they CAN also produce white bellied Standard looking offspring, which has obviously added to the confusion over the years. But these offspring would still be classed as HETERZYGOUS Ebony despite the appearance, so they ARE carrying Ebony.

 

It should be noted that Chinchillas have two colors of belly fur. White or colored as in Charcoal and Ebony. However, there is a variation, a sort of halfway house where the belly fur is tipped giving the animal a ‘dirty’ appearance. Animals that are bought of bred with this appearance are either Ebony/Charcoal related or are Off Colour.

The most useful cross with Ebony is Beige. This will eventually produce you an animal that is brown furred all over, which is known as the TAN. If you are interested in breeding Ebony, then I would suggest that you use the following method which has been used in the past with successful results.

 

1st Generation Ebony to Ebony
2nd Generation Ebony to Standard
3rd Generation Ebony to Ebony
4th Generation Ebony to Standard or Beige….etc…

 

[alert style=”warning”]But one important rule to remember is that you should never breed closer than half brother to half sister[/alert].

Working With Ebony

The Ebony is a wonderful mutation, perhaps I am biased, as I have to admit it is one of my favorites! They have unusual traits as explained above. But once you understand how they work, they are quite straightforward to breed.

People tend to get confused with the terms Homozygous and Heterozygous. This is made easier to understand if you think of it in another way. Homozygous Ebony, is a full Ebony, meaning that it has two Ebony genes, making it a full mutation. Then if you think of Heterozygous as being the same as an Ebony carrier, having only one Ebony gene to pass on to offspring. Meaning you have a 50 percent chance of the Ebony gene being passed into the offspring and obviously 50 percent chance of it not being passed on. To give you an example of this, mating a full or Homozygous Ebony to a regular Standard Chinchilla, will give you Heterozygous Ebony young. So in effect, they are Ebony carriers. However, Ebony working differently to other recessives mutations, such a Violet or Sapphire, means that the Hetero Ebony youngsters born, show the Ebony in them, by being a dark grey all over, including the tummy area. With this, it is then possible to work only with dark-colored Hetero Ebonies, and as the cumulative effect comes into play with Ebony, the Heteros will get darker and darker with generations, if you breed the darkest you have to each other. Another way of making the Heterozygous Ebony darker is by the introduction of Black Velvet. This will add a Blacktip to the fur of the animal, usually seen on the face and the back area more so, than on the tummy area. Adding the Black Velvet means that the animal is then classed as a ToV Heterozygous Ebony. The ToV stands for ‘Touch of Velvet.’ This can also be achieved with Homo Ebonies as well, to enable the blackness of the animal to become more intense, more quickly.

The same effect can be used to your advantage when using Ebony with Beige. Breeding a full Ebony to a regular Beige will produce you, Heterozygous Ebony, as shown in the photo above, as well a Hetero Ebony Beiges. With a Beige that is also a Hetero Ebony, the animal looks like a regular Beige, except that the Beige color covers the whole animal including the tummy area. Obviously then if you have used a ToV Ebony to your Beige, then the beige coloring of the offspring may well also become darker. Effectively, you are adding the Black Velvet of your Ebony into your Beige, making it into a Brown Velvet that has the wrap around fur coloring that the Ebony enables. Once you have your Beige/Hetero Ebony, you can breed this to a Homozygous Ebony. Doing this will allow you to produce further Hetero Ebonies, Beige / Hetero Ebonies, Homo Ebonies, and Tans. A Tan is a Beige / Homo Ebony cross. The darker the Ebony you use and especially if you already have ToV in your Beige / Hetero Ebony, will depend on the darkness of the Tan that you breed. Some can end up being dark Beige all over, whereas others are described as Chocolate, as they are a rich Brown color all over. The Tan works in the same way, being that it also has the cumulative feature, so the more generations you work with, will eventually darken if you select darker animals every generation.

Tan Chinchilla
Tan Chinchilla

So here to recap on the way you can get to work with Ebony, here are the outcomes for colors when breeding.

  • Mating Heterozygous Ebony to Standard produces –
    50 percent Standard
    50 percent Heterozygous Ebony
    ( Remember, however, that with this combination, some Chinchillas may be born with White tummies and maybe Hetero Ebonies, due to the cumulative effect, however, you will not know for sure unless you breed with this animal.)
  • Mating Homozygous Ebony to Standard produces –
    100 percent Heterozygous Ebony
  • Mating Homozygous Ebony to Heterozygous Ebony produces –
    50 percent Heterozygous Ebony
    50 percent Homozygous Ebony
  • Mating Homozygous Ebony to Homozygous Ebony produces –
    100 percent Homozygous Ebony
  • Mating Heterozygous Ebony to Beige produces –
    25 percent Standard
    25 percent Beige
    25 Heterozygous Ebony
    25 percent Heterozygous Ebony / Beige
  • Mating Homozygous Ebony to Beige produces –
    50 percent Heterozygous Ebony
    50 percent Heterozygous Ebony / Beige
  • Mating Homozygous Ebony to Heterozygous Ebony / Beige produces –
    25 percent Heterozygous Ebony
    25 percent Heterozygous Ebony / Beige
    25 percent Homozygous Ebony
    25 Homozygous Ebony / Beige (Tan)
  • Mating Homozygous Ebony to Homozygous Ebony / Beige (Tan) produces –
    50 percent Homozygous Ebony
    50 percent Homozygous Ebony / Beige (Tan)

Have fun working with the Ebony!

Chinchilla Conformation

CHINCHILLA CONFORMATION

CHINCHILLA CONFORMATION

Conformation of a Chinchilla is the overall shape. Ideally, Chinchillas that are bred or purchased should be graded for Confirmation. There are three main areas for examining conformation, these being the body, neck and the head. I hope that the following information will prove useful when choosing partners for your breeding stock or when entering a show. However, just because an animal may have a good or an excellent conformation, this does not necessarily mean that it will do well at a show, other characteristics have to be taken into consideration, for example – fur color, fur density, cleanliness etc… Try to work with your animals, picking out the points that need to be improved and looking for these qualities in other animals, then breeding the two animals together to try to improve. Do not think, however, that you can work miracles overnight, building up your Chinchillas so that they have good or excellent conformation can take a long time. I feel it important to mention, however, that in my opinion Chinchillas with poor conformation are not suitable for showing or for breeding anything other than pet Chinchillas.

BODY CONFORMATION

Ideally, you are looking for an animal that when you look down upon it, it is shaped like a ball. Also, you want the animal to have the size to go with the confirmation whenever possible.

EXCELLENT Is an animal with a short, round evenly shaped body.
GOOD The animal will be more oval in shape. This shape is caused by a narrower chest and front quarters. It is often referred to as egg-shaped, having a little longer body structure.
FAIR This animal would tend to be longer and more narrow in shape.
POOR Is a narrow animal with a very shallow chest, which appears to be pinched from in front of the hips to the front quarters.

NECK CONFORMATION

The length and the density of the fur of the Chinchilla determines the neck conformation. It is possible for an animal to have a high roach or ruff and still be poorly furred in the neck if there is excess fat in the area.

EXCELLENT The neck shall be very short and full. The fur must be dense enough to reach behind the ears and break when the animal moves. The ideal neck should be of a blocky conformation with outstanding density, thereby forcing the fur to stand higher.
GOOD Will be reasonably short and full, creating a virtual straight line from the ears back to the rump. There may be a slight dip, but there must be sufficient length of fur to avoid the dip becoming pronounced.
FAIR In this case, the neck is longer, and the fur is usually thinner and shorter. When viewing the animal from the side a definite dip in the neck area can be observed.
POOR Is a neck that is long and shallow with little fur behind the ears. When viewing from the side, the dip is plain to see, and the fur on the neck area tends to be short and thin.

HEAD CONFORMATION

When looking to purchase a Chinchilla never come away with an animal with a ‘rat’ like face. Try to always go for a squashed looking face and the wider apart the eyes, the better; this shows how broad the head is.

EXCELLENT The animal should have a short and broad head with a short ear and a full arched crown. Upon examination of the animal, the eyes will appear to be deep-set and the nose blunt and square.
GOOD The ears are slightly longer, but the face still falls under the short and broad class. The eyes may appear to be slightly closer and the nose a little longer. A good head usually lacks the full arched crown found in an excellent animal.
FAIR Is one with a medium to long ear and a wedged or triangular shaped face.
POOR Is a chinchilla with a medium to long ear, a very narrow, pointed face with little width between the eyes and the ears. When examined from the front, a very narrow triangle can be imagined using the ears, eyes a, d nose as guideposts. The face is definately ratty in appearance and lacks beauty.

You can try grading your own animals for conformation by use of the above information. I also use a point system with my own animals. Animals that get POOR on any of the three categories do not get a point, but if FAIR is achieved they score one point, for GOOD allow two points and for EXCELLENT award three points on each category scored. Then add them up and work out the animals conformation score out of the nine points available.

Chinchilla Colors… Part 2 – Chinchilla Genetics Chart

Chinchilla-colors-genetics-chart

Part 1 can be found here: Chinchilla Colors, Classification And Basic Genetics

Chinchilla Genetics Chart

One thing to remember when breeding chinchillas is that there is a lethal factor.  The two genes with a lethal factor are white and TOV (touch of velvet).  The lethal factor means that you with have 25% less offspring born to that pairing.  Below are some possible outcomes from pairings.  Hetero is short for heterozygous and means that that animal carries one dominant and one recessive gene.  Homo stands for homozygous and means that that animal carries either two dominant or two recessive genes.


chinchilla-color-standard
Baby Standard ©

Standard mated to:

 

Standard
· 100% Standard

Black Velvet
· 50% Black Velvet
· 50% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Standard

Homo Beige
· 100% Hetero Beige

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero)

White Mosaic
· 50% White Mosaic
· 50% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Pink White

Violet
· 100% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 100% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 50% Light Ebony
· 50% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 50% Light Ebony
· 25% Medium Ebony
· 25% Standard
Dark Ebony
· 37.5% Light Ebony
· 37.5% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Dark Ebony
· 12.5% Standard
Extra Dark Ebony
· 37.5% Medium Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% Dark Ebony
· 6.25% Extra Dark Ebony
· 6.25% Standard

^


chinchilla colors black-velvet
Black Velvet ©

Black Velvet mated to:

Standard
· 50% Black Velvet
· 50% Standard

Black Velvet
· 50% Black Velvet
· 25% Standard
· 25% Fatal

Hetero Beige
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Standard

Homo Beige
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero)

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Fatal
· 12 1/2% Hetero Beige
· 12 1/2% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Fatal

White Mosaic
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% TOV White
· 25% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% TOV White
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 25% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

Violet
· 50% Black Velvet, Violet Carrier
· 50% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 50% Black Velvet, Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% Light TOV Ebony
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 25% Light TOV Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Medium TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium TOV Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 18.75% Light TOV Ebony
· 18.75% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark TOV Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 6.25% Black Velvet
· 6.25% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium TOV Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Light TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Dark TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Extra Dark TOV Ebony
· 3.13% Extra Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Black Velvet
· 3.13% Standard

^


Chinchilla Colors Hetero Beige
Baby Hetero Beige ©

Hetero Beige mated to:

Standard
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Standard

Black Velvet
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Standard

Homo Beige
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Homo Beige

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Homo Beige
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Homo)

White Mosaic
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% Homo Beige
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)

Violet
· 50% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier
· 50% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 50% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 18.75% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 6.25% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 3.13% Extra Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Hetero Beige
· 3.13% Standard

^


Chinchilla Colors Homo Beige
Homo Beige

Homo Beige mated to:

Standard
· 100% Hetero Beige

Black Velvet
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero)

Hetero Beige
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Homo Beige

Homo Beige
· 100% Homo Beige

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Homo)

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 50% Homo Beige
· 50% Brown Velvet (Homo)

White Mosaic
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Pink White (Hetero)

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 50% Homo Beige
· 50% Pink White (Homo)

Violet
· 100% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 100% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 50% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 50% Hetero Beige

Medium Ebony
· 50% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

Dark Ebony
· 37.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 37.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

Extra Dark Ebony
· 37.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 6.25% Hetero Beige

^


Chinchilla Colors brown-velvet
Brown Velvet

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige) mated to:

Standard
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Standard

Black Velvet
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Fatal
· 12 1/2% Hetero Beige
· 12 1/2% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Homo Beige
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Homo Beige
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Homo)

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Fatal
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 6.25% Homo Beige
· 6.25% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Fatal
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Homo Beige

White Mosaic
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% TOV White
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% TOV Pink White (Homo)
· 6.25% Pink White (Homo)
· 6.25% TOV White
· 6.25% White Mosaic
· 6.25% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 6.25% Homo Beige
· 6.25% Black Velvet
· 6.25% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 12.5% Homo Beige
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

Violet
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero), Violet Carrier
· 25% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier
· 25% Black Velvet, Violet Carrier
· 25% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero), Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Black Velvet, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 12.5% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Light TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 6.25% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% Medium TOV Ebony
· 6.25% Medium Ebony
· 6.25% Black Velvet
· 6.25% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 9.38% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium TOV Ebony
· 9.38% Medium Ebony
· 9.38% Light TOV Ebony
· 9.38% Light Ebony
· 3.13% Dark TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% Dark TOV Ebony
· 3.13% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 3.13% Hetero Beige
· 3.13% Black Velvet
· 3.13% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 9.38% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium TOV Ebony
· 9.38% Medium Ebony
· 6.25% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Light TOV Ebony
· 6.25% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark TOV Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 1.56% TOV Chocolate (Hetero)
· 1.56% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 1.56% Extra Dark TOV Ebony
· 1.56% Extra Dark Ebony
· 1.56% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 1.56% Hetero Beige
· 1.56% Black Velvet
· 1.56% Standard

^


Brown Velvet (Homo Beige) mated to:

Standard
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero)

Black Velvet
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Fatal

Hetero Beige
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Homo)

Homo Beige
· 50% Homo Beige
· 50% Brown Velvet (Homo)

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Fatal
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Homo Beige

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 50% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Fatal

White Mosaic
· 25% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 12.5% Homo Beige
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 25% TOV Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 25% Homo Beige

Violet
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero), Violet Carrier
· 50% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero), Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 25% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

Medium Ebony
· 25% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 6.25% Hetero Beige

Extra Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% TOV Chocolate (Hetero)
· 3.13% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 3.13% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 3.13% Hetero Beige

^


chinchilla-color-White Mosaic
White Mosaic ©

White Mosaic mated to:

Standard
· 50% White Mosaic
· 50% Standard

Black Velvet
· 25% TOV White
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Standard

Homo Beige
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Pink White (Hetero)

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% TOV White
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 25% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

White Mosaic
· 50% White Mosaic
· 25% Standard
· 25% Fatal

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Fatal
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 50% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Fatal

Violet
· 50% White Mosaic, Violet Carrier
· 50% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 50% White Mosaic, Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony White
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony White
· 25% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Medium Ebony White
· 12.5% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Ebony White
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 18.75% Light Ebony White
· 18.75% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Ebony White
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 6.25% White Mosaic
· 6.25% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Ebony White
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Light Ebony White
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Dark Ebony White
· 12.5% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Extra Dark Ebony White
· 3.13% Extra Dark Ebony
· 3.13% White Mosaic
· 3.13% Standard

^


chinchilla colors pink-white
Pink White ©

Pink White (Hetero Beige) mated to:

Standard
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Standard

Black Velvet
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% TOV White
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% Homo Beige
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Standard

Homo Beige
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% TOV Pink White (Homo)
· 6.25% Pink White (Homo)
· 6.25% TOV White
· 6.25% White Mosaic
· 6.25% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 6.25% Homo Beige
· 6.25% Black Velvet
· 6.25% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 12.5% Homo Beige
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

White Mosaic
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Fatal
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Fatal
· 12.5% Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% Homo Beige
· 6.25% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 25% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Fatal
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Homo Beige

Violet
· 25% Pink White (Hetero), Violet Carrier
· 25% White Mosaic, Violet Carrier
· 25% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier
· 25% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 25% Pink White (Hetero), Sapphire Carrier
· 25% White Mosaic, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 12.5% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Ebony White
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Ebony White
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Medium Ebony White
· 6.25% Medium Ebony
· 6.25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 6.25% White Mosaic
· 6.25% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 9.38% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 9.38% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Light Ebony White
· 9.38% Light Ebony
· 9.38% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Ebony White
· 9.38% Medium Ebony
· 3.13% Dark Tan White (Hetero)
· 3.13% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% Dark Ebony White
· 3.13% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Pink White (Hetero)
· 3.13% White Mosaic
· 3.13% Hetero Beige
· 3.13% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 9.38% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Ebony White
· 9.38% Medium Ebony
· 6.25% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Light Ebony White
· 6.25% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Tan White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Ebony White
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 1.56% Chocolate White (Hetero)
· 1.56% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 1.56% Extra Dark Ebony White
· 1.56% Extra Dark Ebony
· 1.56% Pink White (Hetero)
· 1.56% White Mosaic
· 1.56% Hetero Beige
· 1.56% Standard

^


Pink White (Homo Beige) mated to:

Standard
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Pink White

Black Velvet
· 25% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

Hetero Beige
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)

Homo Beige
· 50% Homo Beige
· 50% Pink White (Homo)

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 12.5% Homo Beige
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 25% TOV Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 25% Homo Beige

White Mosaic
· 50% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Fatal

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Fatal
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Homo Beige

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 50% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Fatal

Violet
· 50% Pink White (Hetero), Violet Carrier
· 50% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 50% Pink White (Hetero), Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 25% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

Medium Ebony
· 25% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 18.75% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Hetero Beige

Extra Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% Chocolate White (Hetero)
· 3.13% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 3.13% Pink White (Hetero)
· 3.13% Hetero Beige

^


chinchilla colors violet.
Violet ©

Violet mated to:

Standard
· 100% Standard, Violet Carrier

Black Velvet
· 50% Black Velvet, Violet Carrier
· 50% Standard, Violet Carrier

Hetero Beige
· 50% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier
· 50% Standard, Violet Carrier

Homo Beige
· 100% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero), Violet Carrier
· 25% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier
· 25% Black Velvet, Violet Carrier
· 25% Standard, Violet Carrier

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero), Violet Carrier
· 50% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier

White Mosaic
· 50% White Mosaic, Violet Carrier
· 50% Standard, Violet Carrier

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero), Violet Carrier
· 25% White Mosaic, Violet Carrier
· 25% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier
· 25% Standard, Violet Carrier

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 50% Pink White (Hetero), Violet Carrier
· 50% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier

Violet
· 100% Violet

Sapphire
· 100% Standard, Violet-Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 50% Light Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 50% Standard, Violet Carrier

Medium Ebony
· 50% Light Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 25% Medium Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 25% Standard, Violet Carrier

Dark Ebony
· 37.5% Light Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 37.5% Medium Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 12.5% Dark Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 12.5% Standard, Violet Carrier

Extra Dark Ebony
· 37.5% Medium Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 25% Light Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 25% Dark Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 6.25% Extra Dark Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 6.25% Standard, Violet Carrier

^


Sapphire mated to:

Standard
· 100% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Black Velvet
· 50% Black Velvet, Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Hetero Beige
· 50% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Homo Beige
· 100% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero), Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Black Velvet, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero), Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier

White Mosaic
· 50% White Mosaic, Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero), Sapphire Carrier
· 25% White Mosaic, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 50% Pink White (Hetero), Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier

Violet
· 100% Standard, Violet-Sapphire Carrier

Sapphire
· 100% Sapphire

Light Ebony
· 50% Light Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Medium Ebony
· 50% Light Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Medium Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Dark Ebony
· 37.5% Light Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 37.5% Medium Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 12.5% Dark Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 12.5% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Extra Dark Ebony
· 37.5% Medium Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Light Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Dark Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 6.25% Extra Dark Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 6.25% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

^


chinchilla colors ebony-white
Ebony White ©

Light Ebony mated to:

Standard
· 50% Light Ebony
· 50% Standard

Black Velvet
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% Light TOV Ebony
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Standard

Homo Beige
· 50% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 50% Hetero Beige

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Light TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 25% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

White Mosaic
· 25% Light Ebony White
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Ebony White
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 25% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

Violet
· 50% Light Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 50% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 50% Light Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 33.3% Light Ebony
· 33.3% Medium Ebony
· 33.3% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 33.3% Medium Ebony
· 33.3% Light Ebony
· 16.7% Dark Ebony
· 16.7% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 33.3% Medium Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% Dark Ebony
· 8.3% Extra Dark Ebony
· 8.3% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 29.2% Medium Ebony
· 29.2% Dark Ebony
· 20.8% Extra Dark Ebony
· 16.7% Light Ebony
· 4.1% Standard

^


Medium Ebony mated to:

Standard
· 50% Light Ebony
· 25% Medium Ebony
· 25% Standard

Black Velvet
· 25% Light TOV Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Medium TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Standard

Homo Beige
· 50% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 6.25% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% Medium TOV Ebony
· 6.25% Medium Ebony
· 6.25% Black Velvet
· 6.25% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 25% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

White Mosaic
· 25% Light Ebony White
· 25% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Medium Ebony White
· 12.5% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Ebony White
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Medium Ebony White
· 6.25% Medium Ebony
· 6.25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 6.25% White Mosaic
· 6.25% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 25% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

Violet
· 50% Light Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 25% Medium Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 25% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 50% Light Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Medium Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 33.3% Medium Ebony
· 33.3% Light Ebony
· 16.7% Dark Ebony
· 16.7% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 33.3% Medium Ebony
· 22.2% Light Ebony
· 22.2% Dark Ebony
· 11.1% Extra Dark Ebony
· 11.1% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 27.8% Medium Ebony
· 27.8% Dark Ebony
· 22.2% Extra Dark Ebony
· 16.7% Light Ebony
· 5.6% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 36.1% Extra Dark Ebony
· 27.8% Dark Ebony
· 22.2% Medium Ebony
· 11.1% Light Ebony
· 2.8% Standard

^


Dark Ebony mated to:

Standard
· 37.5% Light Ebony
· 37.5% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Dark Ebony
· 12.5% Standard

Black Velvet
· 18.75% Medium TOV Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 18.75% Light TOV Ebony
· 18.75% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark TOV Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 6.25% Black Velvet
· 6.25% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 18.75% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 6.25% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% Standard

Homo Beige
· 37.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 37.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 9.38% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium TOV Ebony
· 9.38% Medium Ebony
· 9.38% Light TOV Ebony
· 9.38% Light Ebony
· 3.13% Dark TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% Dark TOV Ebony
· 3.13% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 3.13% Hetero Beige
· 3.13% Black Velvet
· 3.13% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 18.75% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 6.25% Hetero Beige

White Mosaic
· 18.75% Medium Ebony White
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 18.75% Light Ebony White
· 18.75% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Ebony White
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 6.25% White Mosaic
· 6.25% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 9.38% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 9.38% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Light Ebony White
· 9.38% Light Ebony
· 9.38% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Ebony White
· 9.38% Medium Ebony
· 3.13% Dark Tan White (Hetero)
· 3.13% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% Dark Ebony White
· 3.13% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Pink White (Hetero)
· 3.13% White Mosaic
· 3.13% Hetero Beige
· 3.13% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 18.75% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 18.75% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Hetero Beige

Violet
· 37.5% Light Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 37.5% Medium Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 12.5% Dark Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 12.5% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 37.5% Light Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 37.5% Medium Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 12.5% Dark Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 12.5% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 33.3% Medium Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% Dark Ebony
· 8.3% Extra Dark Ebony
· 8.3% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 27.8% Medium Ebony
· 27.8% Dark Ebony
· 22.2% Extra Dark Ebony
· 16.7% Light Ebony
· 5.6% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 37% Extra Dark Ebony
· 26% Dark Ebony
· 22.2% Medium Ebony
· 11.1% Light Ebony
· 3.7% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 50% Extra Dark Ebony
· 24.1% Dark Ebony
· 16.7% Medium Ebony
· 7.4% Light Ebony
· 1.8% Standard

^


Extra Dark Ebony mated to:

Standard
· 37.5% Medium Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% Dark Ebony
· 6.25% Extra Dark Ebony
· 6.25% Standard

Black Velvet
· 18.75% Medium TOV Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Light TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Dark TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Extra Dark TOV Ebony
· 3.13% Extra Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Black Velvet
· 3.13% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 3.13% Extra Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Hetero Beige
· 3.13% Standard

Homo Beige
· 37.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 6.25% Hetero Beige

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 9.38% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium TOV Ebony
· 9.38% Medium Ebony
· 6.25% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Light TOV Ebony
· 6.25% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark TOV Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 1.56% TOV Chocolate (Hetero)
· 1.56% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 1.56% Extra Dark TOV Ebony
· 1.56% Extra Dark Ebony
· 1.56% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 1.56% Hetero Beige
· 1.56% Black Velvet
· 1.56% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 18.75% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% TOV Chocolate (Hetero)
· 3.13% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 3.13% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 3.13% Hetero Beige

White Mosaic
· 18.75% Medium Ebony White
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Light Ebony White
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Dark Ebony White
· 12.5% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Extra Dark Ebony White
· 3.13% Extra Dark Ebony
· 3.13% White Mosaic
· 3.13% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 9.38% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Ebony White
· 9.38% Medium Ebony
· 6.25% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Light Ebony White
· 6.25% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Tan White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Ebony White
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 1.56% Chocolate White (Hetero)
· 1.56% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 1.56% Extra Dark Ebony White
· 1.56% Extra Dark Ebony
· 1.56% Pink White (Hetero)
· 1.56% White Mosaic
· 1.56% Hetero Beige
· 1.56% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 18.75% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% Chocolate White (Hetero)
· 3.13% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 3.13% Pink White (Hetero)
· 3.13% Hetero Beige

Violet
· 37.5% Medium Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 25% Light Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 25% Dark Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 6.25% Extra Dark Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 6.25% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 37.5% Medium Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Light Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Dark Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 6.25% Extra Dark Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 6.25% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 29.2% Medium Ebony
· 29.2% Dark Ebony
· 20.8% Extra Dark Ebony
· 16.7% Light Ebony
· 4.1% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 36.1% Extra Dark Ebony
· 27.8% Dark Ebony
· 22.2% Medium Ebony
· 11.1% Light Ebony
· 2.8% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 50% Extra Dark Ebony
· 24.1% Dark Ebony
· 16.7% Medium Ebony
· 7.4% Light Ebony
· 1.8% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 61.7% Extra Dark Ebony
· 19.8% Dark Ebony
· 12.4% Medium Ebony
· 4.9% Light Ebony
· 1.2% Standard

^

chinchilla colors dark-tan
Dark Tan ©
Chinchilla Colors TOV-Dark-Tan
TOV-Dark-Tan ©

Classification and Systematics of Chinchillas

There is much confusion relating to the classification of the different species (or sub-species) of chinchillas. Different terminologies and the blurring of time have resulted in rather a complicated tangle of dual-naming and cultural differences.

I am not attempting to either clarify or put any records straight, indeed, my research may be equally flawed, but I shall attempt merely to catalog the following, in the hope that someone may find it of interest.

  • Latin Scientific Name: Chinchilla Chinchilla brevicaudata (1848)
  • Classification History: Eriomys chinchilla (1829) – Lagostomus laniger (1831) – Chinchilla brevicaudata (major) (1879)
  • Common Names: True, Greater short-tailed chinchilla, Precious, Royal, La Chinchilla Real, Peruvian Chinchilla, La Chinchilla Indiana.
  • Distinguishing Features: This species has the shortest tail and ears relative to body length.
  • Latin Scientific Name: Chinchilla Chinchilla boliviana (1911)
  • Classification History: Chinchilla boliviana (1911) – Chinchilla intermedia (1939)
  • Common Names: La Chinchilla del Altiplano, Boliviano, Brevicaudata (called this by early ranchers), La Chinchilla Cordillerana, Mountain, Bolivian, Lesser Short-Tailed Chinchilla, La Plata, Argentine, Cordilleras Chinchilla.
  • Latin Scientific Name: Chinchilla lanigera (1782)
  • Classification History: Mus laniger (1782) – Cricetus chinchilla (1814) – Chinchilla velligera (1934) – Lommus lanigera (1803) – Cricetus lanigera (1822)
  • Common Names: Velligera, La Chinchilla Bastarda, Hybrid, Lesser, Coastal, La Chinchilla Costina, La Chinchilla Chilena, Long-Tailed Chinchilla.
  • Apparently, a chap called De Chant found several different “types” of Chinchilla lanigera.

La Plata Type: Denser bone structure, heavy-set, roundish and compact. Short, wide head. Larger animal.

Costina Type: Lighter bone structure (in comparison). Longer hind legs. Lighter, thinner build, with a narrower more pointed head.

Raton Type: Similar to the La Plata type, but about a third smaller.

The above information on “types” is relatively academic now, as many decades of selective breeding has “blended” the distinct body shapes into hybrid “types”, displaying the characteristics that the breeders wanted. However, you do occasionally see a chinchilla that easily fits in with one of the above descriptions.

Once again, may I reiterate that although it is fun to breed some of the stunning colors that are available today, please do so with the health of future generations in mind. Some recessive mutations tend to produce weak and small offspring. They, therefore, require out-crossing to BIG, TOP QUALITY Standards whenever possible. NEVER breed from any chinchilla that has had dental problems within its bloodline. Fur-chewers (a vice) should also be excluded from a breeding programme if possible.

Chinchillas: Hand-Rearing Kits, Fostering & Rotating, Reviving Dead Kits

Hand-Rearing Kits, Fostering & Rotating, Reviving Dead Kits

Occasionally a female chin has difficulty in feeding are large litter, or her milk is very slow to come in. This may mean that her kits become very hungry and desperate and if her milk is inadequate some or all of the kits may starve.

However, happily most healthy females cope very well with most moderate-sized litters.

Happy, well-fed kits will suckle well, have tails that curl upwards – and full-feeling bellies. Kits that are not getting enough milk will have hollow-feeling bellies, tails that do no curl upwards. They will also fight each other, and frantically run around the cage in a desperate search for milk, they will also not be gaining any weight.

Here are some suggestions on what things an owner can do to help.

Rotate-Feeding

This is only an option if the dam is producing milk. On occasions when triplets (or more) are born, the larger, stronger kits feed well, but the smaller kits (runts?) do not get a look-in and are fought off by the larger kits.

This is where rotating them is very useful. I remove the larger well-fed kits for up to two hours at a time, allowing the weaker kit/s to suckle undisturbed. The larger kits are placed in a secure, warm box with a soft towel to snuggle into, whilst the smaller kits take their turn with mum, unmolested.

The kits need to be rotated very 2 hours or so during the day and at least 2 or 3 times at night for the first fortnight (always remembering to return the larger kits when the smaller ones have had their allocated time with mum).

After the first fortnight, you can gradually cut down on the nightly rotations. Then over the next few weeks (until they are weaned around eight weeks old), you can gradually reduce the daily rotations.

If the kits are not fighting, then the weaker kits can be left in with the dam all the time and only the stronger kits are removed. If there is continual fighting, then the weaker kits need to be removed when the stronger kits are returned, for their own safety. This is when you may need to hand-feed the weaker kits with some additional feeds yourself, a few times a day, in order for them to thrive.

The Pros:

  • The dam does all the cleaning and looking-after of the kits for you.
  • There is no equipment to sterilize and prepare.
  • There is no milk formula to make up.

The Cons:

  • You still may have to hand-feed the kits yourself a couple of times a day.
  • Rotation only works if the dam has milk.
  • You still have to get up during the night.
  • Not much good if you have to work full-time.

Reviving Seemingly Stillborn Kits

Many people (including myself) have come across the odd kit that appears to have been born dead. It may not be breathing and appear to be rather chilled and lifeless. Usually, our first reaction is to pick up the poor kit – examine it for signs of life – and when we find none – give it up for dead. However, if the kit has only recently been born – you can try to revive it. Here are some tips:

  • You need to keep the kit warm and stimulate it’s breathing and blood circulation.
  • The easiest way to do this is to rub the kits (fairly vigorously) in a soft towel – starting with its head down to help drain any birth fluids from its lungs.
  • You can also try gently swinging the kit – with a straight arm – to try to clear its lungs of fluids – but DONT shake the poor thing.
  • If it is chilled – some breeders recommend immersing the kit (not it’s head though) in warm water – to raise its body temperature.
  • I have found the towel method is better – as you also need to get the kits circulation going as soon a possible.
  • Keep going – don’t give up after 5 minutes. Alternate between the warm water and firm but gentle toweling if you wish.
  • DO NOT try breathing into its nose or mouth – we have much much bigger lungs than a tiny kit – and you will only do damage.
    As a last resort, you can try blowing at its nose from a distance of a few inches.
  • DO NOT try to feed it any brandy either!!

Many breeders have successfully revived kits that have appeared to be stillborn – and it is always worth giving it a try.

Fostering

I have had 100% success when fostering – with an age gap gap of no more than 4 weeks between the foster mothers own kits and the orphan/s – (but you ideally want them as close to the same age as possible). I always try to use females that have only had only ONE kit of their own, at a push, two, as I find older kits can gang-up and bully smaller orphans, (but if mum has adequate milk and the kits are all of a similar age, then she should be able to rear three kits in total with few problems).

I remove the females own kit/s into a small box, and put the orphan/s in with them. They are then left for an hour or two, for their scents to intermingle. Some soiled bedding can be added to the box to assist with this.

When some time has elapsed, orphan/s are put in with the female first and allowed to settle and bond with the female, as undisturbed as possible.

If all looks OK, then her own kit/s are returned. Monitor everything closely and ensure that the kits are not squabbling too much (a little barging around at first is normal).

The female’s milk should increase on demand to allow for the extra kit/s, but this may take a day or two, so rotational or supplemental feeding may also be needed until the milk supply compensates.

Just one word of caution though, don’t expect miracles from a foster mother and don’t expect her to rear more than three kits in total (including her own).

Hand-Rearing

I have successfully hand-reared many kits on the evaporated milk formula to date, even though chinchillas are lactose-intolerant. However, if you do get problems (such as the kits getting upset tummies) then try kitten milk instead of evaporated milk.

Here is my method – although other chinnie owners may have other methods that work equally well:

Formula:

  • One part evaporated milk
  • Two parts cooled boiled water
  • One pinch of glucose
  • One drop of abidec vitamins

(Optional: you can also add a pinch of probiotics to the formula if necessary – to maintain a healthy gut flora)

** Some websites appear to recommend using condensed milk!!! This is completely wrong – and only evaporated milk should be used!!!

I keep the evaporated milk in a sterile sealed Tupperware container in the refrigerator – it will keep fresh for 3 days this way. I always make up a fresh formula with each feed (the kits seem to prefer this) and never re-warm a formula for another feed. I also sterilise all the equipment, containers and pipettes between each feed with Milton fluid (according to the instructions) just as you would for a human baby. Make sure you are sterilising everything thoroughly – as milk is an excellent breeding-ground for bacteria.

If your kits do develop diarrhoea you can give them a few drops of paediatric kaolin before each feed – this usually sorts it out quickly – or try diluting the milk a little more until their tummies are back to normal. If all this fails then you may have to try them on kitten milk instead. Diarrhoea can dehydrate kits very quickly – which will make them feel unwell so they wont feel like drinking any fluids – which makes things worse – a kind of “catch 22” situation. So you need to sort out any diarrhoea VERY quickly – i.e within six hours if possible.

Bring the formula up to blood temperature when feeding – I do this by standing the formula in a bowl of warm water to warm up slightly – if you feed the milk too cold it can give them tummy-ache. I also “top & tail” the kits with every feed using a dampened cotton wool ball.

After the first week I make solid food available to the kits – if they wish to try eating it. At two weeks old I have observed kits “tasting” water from mums water bottle – so you can at least offer orphans a water bottle at this age – even if they ignore it.

Make sure you are sitting somewhere comfortable and have everything you need to hand. If you are relaxed and settled the kits seem to sense this and will drink more. Give them as much formula as they will happily drink – once they start pushing the pipette away – then stop – they have had enough.

Avoid getting milk into their noses at all costs. If they start blowing milk-bubbles from the nose – that means they have breathed some milk in – you may have fed the milk too quickly – if this happens – stop feeding them – wipe the milk away from their nose – and return them to their “home” to recover for half an hour before trying again.

  • First two weeks: Every two hours they will need a feed.
  • Two to four weeks: Every three to four hours (depending on the kits appetite and weight-gain).
  • Four to six weeks: Every four to six hours (you can start cutting out the night feeds).
  • Six to eight weeks: Every six hours (four feeds a day). You can also start gradually diluting the formula with more water to start to wean the kits off the milk.
  • By eight weeks: They should be virtually weaned off milk by now, but if they still want a feed or two a day then you can continue until they are ten weeks old.
  • I usually try to wean them by eight to ten weeks – but usually, they decide when to wean themselves!

 

For you-you will need:

  • A loud alarm clock
  • Unlimited cans of Red Bull energy drink
  • The patience of a saint

 

 

Reference & Credit

MLA

“Our Chinchillas Had A Baby Recently- We Think Maybe 1-2 …” Just Answer. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Oct. 2018 <https://www.justanswer.com/veterinary/624lt-chinchillas-baby-recently-think-mayb>.

Chinchilla Colors, Classification And Basic Genetics

Chinchilla Colors-Classification-And-Basic Genetics

I freely admit that genetics is not my strongest subject, and as I prefer to stick with what I know, so I shall merely gloss over this topic and just explain the very basics that I am comfortable with. Thus, this article will not be of interest to experienced breeders with a good knowledge. However, I hope that it may explain some things for people new to breeding chinchillas.

There are now many color variants being bred, including the “blends” and crosses that are possible too. However, to achieve a certain color you do need to have an understanding of how to get there without compromising the health of a chinchilla.

Some mutations tend to breed weak. By this, I mean that although the easiest way of achieving a certain colored kit (for instance, Violet) is to breed two Violets together, this may not be the best way regarding the quality of the offspring. Two Violets bred together may produce a small kit, with poor color and qualities. The same applies to any mutation really.

Therefore it is always recommended (even for pet owners) that a mutation is always bred to a GOOD QUALITY standard or standard carriers whenever possible, to impart, health, vitality, and size into the offspring. Good breeding practices ensure strong and healthy chinchillas well into the future.

Chinchilla Colors Standard Grey
Standard Grey ©

Useful Terms

Before I continue, here are some useful terminology and meanings.

  • Homozygous – two identical alleles on the corresponding gene loci.
  • Heterozygous – two different alleles on the corresponding gene loci.
  • Phenotype – an animals appearance/charactisterics
  • Genotype – an animals genetic makeup
  • Mutation – in this case, any color that is not Standard
  • Chromosome – Structures in a cell’s nucleus that house the genes (chinchillas have 64!!)
  • Allele – one of two alternate forms of a gene that can have the same locus on chromosomes. They may be responsible for alternative traits – i.e., some alleles are dominant over others.
  • Locus – A locus describes the position of a gene on a chromosome. A locus can be occupied by any of the alleles of the gene. (Leading us – once again to the term homozygous = (have the same allele at a locus) or heterozygous = (have different alleles at a locus).
  • TOV – An American term “Touch of Velvet” meaning a chinchilla with the “Velvet” gene
  • Standard – Standard Grey – the natural color of chinchillas
  • Lethal Gene Factor – certain colors (white and velvet) are not viable if homozygous for that color (i.e., they can only exist in the heterozygous state). These colors are said to have a “lethal factor.”
  • Carrier – A chinchilla of any particular phenotype may “carry” a single gene for another color. i.e., may be a heterozygous carrier for a recessive color. Recessive colors are only expressed in the homozygous state (when a chinchilla inherits both genes). A chinchilla can carry more than one recessive color – if bred to do so.
  • Recessive Inheritance – If both parents carry a recessive, gene (i.e., Violet). The parents, although carriers, are not violet colored. Their offspring will always be violet (if they inherit both genes) violet carrier (if they inherit one gene) or “normal” if they don’t inherit any genes.
  • Dominant Inheritance – One parent has a single, dominant gene (i.e., black velvet) – which appears phenotypically. When the parent mates with a “normal” or standard (non-carrying) mate, the offspring will either be Black velvet or standard, but they are never carriers as the dominant gene cannot be carried.
Chinchilla Colors Black Velvet
Credit: Rayne4 – Black Velvet ©

Main Color “Groups”

Here is a list of the main color groups (not including every cross or blend that is possible, or I would have to write a novel for that!!)

  • Standard Grey
  • Black Velvet
  • Ebony
  • Tan
  • Ebony Velvet (called TOV ebony in the US)
  • Charcoal (a true recessive mutation in its own right – not recognized in the States and their term “charcoal” is often used to describe Hetero. Ebonies which are, in Europe, a separate mutation)
  • Pastel
  • Charbrown
  • Wilson White (including silver and mosaic)
  • Pink/white
  • Black/white cross (In the US known as TOV White)
  • Violet
  • Ultra Violet
  • Beige/Violet
  • Violet Wrap
  • Sapphire
  • Royal Blue
  • Homozygous Beige (also known as (old fashioned terms): Apricot, Champagne, Rose)
  • Heterozygous Beige
  • Brown Velvet (In the US known as TOV Beige)
Chinchilla Colors ebony
Ebony ©

Of the above colors, many can be crossed to produce double and triple recessives, which can then produce varied mutation offspring, although many will have a similar phenotype.

However, it must be mentioned that the Velvet and the White gene have a lethal gene factor when in the homozygous state. This means that velvet to velvet and white to white pairings are inadvisable as this will result in 1 in 4 (25%) embryos being non-viable. These two colors can only exist in the heterozygous state.

White to velvet pairings are possible as the lethal factor exists on different loci for each color.

Recessive colors are only expressed when the chinchilla inherits two genes from its parents. Animals that only inherit one gene are known as carriers and will appear to be “normal” in phenotype (i.e., a Standard chinchilla that “carries” Violet – AKA: A Standard Violet Carrier).

Dominant colors are expressed differently, and only one parent need be that color to pass it onto the next generation.

Chinchilla Colors White Violet
White Violet ©

Basic Pairing Results

Here are some of the most basic examples (NOT including Ebony or Double Recessives) of the possible offspring (in %) statistically expected from certain pairings.

  • Standard X Standard = 100% Standard
  • Standard X Hetero. Beige = 50% Standard – 50% Hetero. Beige
  • Standard X Homo. Beige = 100% Hetero. Beige
  • Standard X Pink/White = 25% Pink/White – 25% Standard – 25% Hetero. Beige – 25% Wilson White
  • Standard X Wilson White = 50% Wilson White – 50% Standard
  • Standard X Black Velvet = 50% Standard – 50% Black Velvet
  • Standard X Brown Velvet = 25% Standard – 25% Brown Velvet – 25% Black Velvet – 25% Hetero. Beige
  • Standard X Violet = 100% Standard (carrying Violet)
  • Standard (carrying Violet) X Violet = 50% Violet – 50% Standard (carrying Violet)
  • Hetero. Beige X Hetero. Beige = 50% Homo. Beige – 25% Hetero. Beige – 25% Standard
  • Hetero. Beige X Black Velvet = 25% Hetero. Beige – 25% Brown Velvet – 25% Standard – 25% Black Velvet
  • Homo. Beige X Black Velvet = 50% Brown Velvet – 25% Hetero, Beige
  • Black Velvet X Wilson White = 25% Wilson White – 25% Black/White Cross – 25% Black Velvet – 25% Standard
  • Black Velvet X Brown Velvet = 25% Brown Velvet – 25% Black Velvet – 12.5% Standard – 12.5% Hetero. Beige – 25% Lethal Gene
  • Wilson White X Pink/White = 25% Pink/White – 25% Wilson White – 12.5% Standard – 12.5% Hetero. Beige – 25% Lethal Gene
  • Pink/White X Brown Velvet = 18.75% Brown Velvet – 12.50% Hetero. Beige – 18.75% TOV Pink/White – 18.75% Pink/White – 6.25% Standard – 6.25% Homo. Beige – 6.25% Wilson White – 6.25% Black Velvet – 6.25% Black./White Cross
  • Black Velvet X Violet = 50% Standard (carrying Violet) – 50% Black Velvet (carrying Violet)
  • Violet X Black Velvet (carrying Violet) = 25% Violet – 25% Standard (carrying Violet) – 25% Black Velvet (carrying Violet) – 25% Ultra Violet
  • Homo. Beige X Violet = 100% Hetero. Beige (carrying violet)
  • Hetero. Beige (carrying Violet) X Violet = 25% Violet – 25% Standard (carrying Violet) – 25% Hetero. Beige (carrying Violet) – 25% Beige/Violet (AKA: Pearl)

Charcoal and Sapphire recessive mutations behave in the same manner as Violet.

Chinchilla Colors Black
Black ©

 

Chinchilla Environment ~ Chinchilla Proofing Your Home & Fixing Boredom

Chinchilla Environment ~ Chinchilla Proofing Your Home & Fixing Boredom

Hopefully, this article will impart some helpful hints, from chinchilla-proofing your home to preventing vices associated with boredom, such as fur-chewing.

Daily Exercise

Chinchillas really do appreciate extra exercise away from their cages. Many breeders are unable to do this; simply because with such large amounts of stock, they would not have enough hours in the day or enough pairs of eyes to supervise them sufficiently. However, the average chinchilla owner with just a couple of chinchillas should be able to make time for them to have a daily run.

Chinchillas will happily take as much exercise as you can allow them, from 15 minutes to a couple of hours a day.

The most important thing to remember when allowing chinchillas out of their cages is that they MUST be supervised at ALL TIMES. Otherwise, they can get themselves into trouble in the blink of an eye!

It is best to slowly increase their exercise time, especially if the chinchilla is not accustomed to being away from its cage. Ideally, the cage should be positioned so that the chinchilla can return to it for food, water, and security whenever it wishes. If this is not possible, then a ramp can assist. Start by allowing the chinchilla about ten minutes of exercise at a time – gradually increasing the time as the chinchilla becomes more accustomed to the exercise (and fitter!).

Chinchillas do not know when to stop and can sometimes exhaust themselves, so ensure that they return to their cages within a sensible time period.

Give the chinchilla a small treat when play-time has finished, and give the chinchilla a sandbath after exercise too. These will encourage the chinchilla to return to its cage more willingly or, better still, voluntarily. Try not to chase the chinchilla around when trying to return it to the cage as this will only make the chinchilla resent being caught and handled.

Obviously, due to a chinchillas susceptibility to the heat, it is recommended to only allow a chinchilla limited exercise on a hot day, confined only to the cooler evening hours.

Chinchilla-Proofing Your Home

If you are allowing a chinchilla the freedom of a room or two, then you will have to take measures to ensure that the chinchilla will not harm itself or your possessions.

Wall & Painted Surfaces

Skirting boards and other painted or non-painted wooden furnishings around the house can be sprayed with a “stop-chew” spray manufactured especially for pets. This is not 100% effective with chinchillas though. However, care must be taken to ensure that a chinchilla does not chew painted surfaces where the paint may contain lead (such as in older houses) – as this will result in lead poisoning. Always keep your chinchilla away from the lead-based paint.

Electrical

. Electric cables can be protected and covered with a rubber “cable-tidy,” a length of garden hose that has been slit open and popped over any cabling will work in the same manner, or simply cables can be unplugged and put out of reach.

Plants

Plants should be removed from the room. There are a lot of plants that are poisonous to pets including chinchillas.

Windows & Doors

Windows and doors should be shut firmly – and family members informed that the chinchillas are out for their daily run.

Toilets

Toilet lids should be closed (many a chinchilla has drowned in toilets, sadly).

Watch Your Step

Watch where you walk too, chinchillas move fast and can get under your feet, but it is unlikely they would survive getting heavily stepped on, as they are fragile little things.

Other Pets

Any other pets that may interfere with the chinchillas should be excluded from the same room while the chinchillas are free (although, chinchillas usually seem unafraid of dogs and cats).

Tiny Holes

Any tiny aperture (believe me, chinchillas can fit through the tiniest gap) should be blocked up to prevent the chinchilla squeezing through or behind objects such as fire-places or bookshelves.

Supervision

Above all, never leave them unsupervised.

 

The Sandbath

A daily sandbath, although performing a necessary fur-cleaning service, also helps with the general well-being of chinchillas.

They are very clean animals and dislike getting soiled in any way. If they are deprived of a sandbath for any length of time, they can get quite depressed and uncomfortable.

20 minutes a day is usually adequate for a chinchilla’s health and well being. Too little sandbaths will result in dirty fur and an unhappy chinchilla, and too many may dry the chinchilla’s skin out (especially those chinchillas kept indoors that may also feel the drying effects of central heating as well).

Use ONLY volcanic pumice or sepiolite (both available in pet-shops) and not silver/play or builders sand.

The sand can be sieved regularly to remove any debris, droppings or wet areas and can be replaced completely every now and then.

 

Cage-Toys

There are plenty of toys available on the pet-market that is suitable for chinchillas. Most wooden items manufactured for pets make great “chews.” Chubes are excellent (vegetable cardboard tunnels), lava bites (made from pumice), the list is endless.

Avoid anything made from plastic or rubber, as if ingested by the chinchilla, could cause an intestinal blockage.

Various kinds of wood twigs and branches make excellent chew-sticks or “climbing-frames,” and the bark can be eaten to provide a treat that is excellent for dental health (as they require much chewing and may help to wear the teeth).

All wood should be sourced from an area that has not been sprayed with chemicals, and the wood should be scrubbed clean and ideally “seasoned” for a couple of weeks too.

Apple-tree twigs and branches come top of the list, and most chinchillas adore eating the bark. Eating, cooking and crab apple trees are all suitable, so are pear trees.

Medlar trees and any other fruit tree are great too – as long as the fruit does NOT contain stones. Hazel and willow are ok – but are not as favored.

Some people also give their chinchillas the tough; woody rose “prunings” (minus the thorns) and dry, seasoned, open pinecones. I have not tried them with my chinchillas – so cannot comment on their suitability from personal experience (yet). I have tried Hawthorn though – and the chins love it and sill strip and eat the bark. It is also safe to give them a few leaves too but introduce these slowly to avoid stomach upsets.

Give the chinchilla one or two of the above items at a time but don’t overdo them or they will lose their novelty for the animals. And please don’t over-clutter their cages, so the poor chinchillas cannot move for toys!

 

Hay

Hay fed ad-lib can prevent boredom, as the chinchilla can munch on it as and when it wishes. Hay (as mentioned in a previous article) also provides the main source of fiber in a chinchilla’s diet too, which is good for digestion and tooth wear.

Wheels vs. Balls

There are a couple of the most expensive “exercise” aids available to pet-owners these include giant-sized “exercise balls” and the (rarely available) chinchilla wheel.

In my opinion, exercise balls are wholly unsuitable for chinchillas. Chinchillas enjoy exploring their environment and not getting stuffed into a plastic bubble. Also, the rolling momentum of the ball makes it very hard for the chinchilla to stop in them, and they can quickly become over-heated and exhausted. This often results in chinchillas having fits. I, therefore, cannot recommend them.

Chinchilla wheels, on the other hand, are usually loved by chinchillas, once they have got the hang of them. They are getting much easier to get hold of in the UK & US. Extra-large wheels, manufactured for rats are not suitable.

Chinchilla wheels need to be at least 14″ in diameter, have fully enclosed bearings, and be of solid construction (not runged) to protect tails and toes from getting trapped. The “Exotic Nutrition 15″ Chin-Sprint” and the “Chin Spin Chinchilla Wheel” (both manufactured specifically for chinchillas) can currently only be imported from the USA and Europe.

If you can get hold of a wheel they are well worth the effort – my chins have two superb 15” wheels, one of each of the above!

Companionship/Breeding

Chinchillas do enjoy company, but there are a few considerations to bear in mind when purchasing a pair of chinchillas or buying a companion for an existing pet.

Firstly, chinchillas are territorial and require an introduction period before being accepted into the same cage together. This time period can vary according to the temperament and age of the chinchillas and whether or not it is a same-sex pair or an opposite-sex pair that you are trying to introduce.

If you wish to keep an opposite-sex pair together, then you will have to bear in mind that they WILL breed, so you will need to be prepared for this eventuality. Extra cages will need to be purchased to wean any offspring, and the original pair will also need to be separated from time to time to avoid over-breeding the female, which can be detrimental to her health. Castration of the male is a feasible option, to prevent unwanted litters, but ensure that the vet has performed the operation before, and do some research on the subject first (I will endeavor to write an article covering this, in the near future, for Fur & Feather).

Young females are the usually the easiest same-sex pair to get together, but there are exceptions to every rule.

If you prefer to keep a single chinchilla, then you will need to bear in mind that YOU will become it’s bonded “cage-mate,” and will, therefore, need to ensure that you spend as much time as possible interacting with it.