How to Build a Chinchilla Cage – Make a Homemade Chinchilla Cage

How to Build a Chinchilla Cage – Make a Homemade Chinchilla Cage

Most people will not have the time or skills to build their own DIY Chinchilla cages but if you do then this page will give you a good guide on how to begin. If however you just want to get your Chinchilla cage and get going with owning a pet Chinchilla then see our Best Chinchilla cage recommendations page.

HOMEMADE CHINCHILLA CAGE

Do be very careful if you are constructing and building a DIY Chinchilla cage because if you don’t get it right you might find your Chinchilla gets his feet and legs trapped in a corner of the cage. Also be careful with the materials you use for the cage because many types of wood are treated with toxic chemicals which can poison and kill your pet. Make sure the wood is untreated.

Do not build your Chinchilla cage with wire mesh that a Chinchilla can get caught up in if the gaps are too large. Unfortunately, many well-meaning people try to save money by building their own Chinchilla cages and they don’t realize the dangerous environment they have created. Do not use any plastic – your rodent Chinchilla will chew on it and ingest the plastic.

Be careful with shelving inside your Chinchilla cages because they must be solid, your Chinchilla will jump and leap about from shelf from to shelf. Be careful not to have a situation where falling or slipping from the top shelf means your Chinchilla falls all the way down to the bottom, stagger the shelves.

BUILDING CHINCHILLA CAGES

Why build Chinchilla cages? You will save money. Animal cages, if you can find them locally, are still quite expensive. A large cage could easily cost you $300 or more. If you are shopping on the Internet or mail-order (which you might have to do with limited local options) and now you’ll have to add in high shipping costs. Building a cage for your Chinchilla, even a large one, should cost well under $200.

Even more importantly, though, is the opportunity to build the Chinchilla cage you want. If you buy one in a pet store you are settling for someone else’s design. The cage you find might not fit your space, or be particularly attractive. If you build your own cage you can create the size and shape you want – in addition to a few, convenient upgrades you won’t find in a pet store cage. I’ve noticed the average Chinchilla owner will want to upgrade about two years from their initial purchase: so why not build the cage you really want in the first place?

CHINCHILLA CAGE PLANS AND DESIGN

For the frame, I recommend 1×2 lumber (ash or pine, whatever is inexpensive). Get enough to create a complete 3d box for the frame of your cage. You’ll some 2-inch wood screws to build the frame. The melamine panels (get them cut where you buy them, or cut them with a circular or table saw) fit inside the frame, attached with Liquid Nails or another adhesive. You can caulk the edges to make them watertight.

Build a door or doors the same way (a frame of wood) but staple wire to the door so you can see inside the cage. Other considerations include covering the outside with a plywood (for a nice furniture look), staining the exterior pine, building shelves, and attaching wheels to the base if you want to move the cage around easily.

Although the process may sound daunting, all of these steps could easily be completed by a beginner. Just carefully plan your Chinchilla cage before you buy anything, and ask for help at the big box store or lumberyard you buy at (have them make the cuts for you). Eventually, you will have the Chinchilla cage you’ve always dreamed of.

For more help and ideas, be sure to read some of the DIY Chinchilla cage post in our Chinchilla Cage category. I’ll have pictures and many more details there, and I’ll be happy to help you through the process.

VIDEO ON BUILDING A CHINCHILLA CAGE

This video below is a very clever use of shelving units. This gives you a good idea of whether you can do it yourself or whether you are better off just buying a Chinchilla cage right now with no hassles and no time wasted! Watch the video on how to build a Chinchilla cage:

Treasures of many have an Etsy shop where she crafts fleece Chinchilla cage covers.  I’m going to try out some of her items as well as items from a few other places. I’ll let you know what I think of the products once I’ve had a chance to test them out.

Chinchilla Basic First Aid & Basic Wound Management

Chinchilla-Basic-First-Aid-Wound-Management

Basic Wound Management.

Every chinny owner will, at some point, come across a wound on their pet – these can range in severity from superficial wounds such as a scratch, or a cut lip/nose, to the more serious nipped toe (some chins have had their toes nipped clean off by another chinny) to Bumblefoot, or surgical wounds, tumors, and abscesses.

The correct care of such wounds is essential to minimize/prevent the risk of infection and to provide the optimum environment for healing.

Research into wound healing has taken place for many years – the following is based on such research and my personal experience as a chinny owner. However, please bear in mind that wound care is a very complex process and it is not possible to go into all the connotations of wound management/healing in this article.

Wounds.

A wound can be defined as – a cut or break in the continuity of any tissue caused by injury or operation.
There are many different types of wounds. The most common found in chinchilla keeping will be:

  • Surgical Wounds
  • Traumatic – amputations (e.g., toes), bites, abrasions, bruising
  • Burns
  • Abscess
  • Chronic Ulcers (such as bumblefoot)

It is important to assess the wound first and foremost to try to establish the underlying cause (so further occurrences may be prevented where possible) and to formulate a treatment plan.

Wound Assessment.

Assessment of the wound should include:

General condition of the animal, clinical signs of infection which include the surrounding skin condition (red, hot, fluctuant [squishy]), pus, lost fur, the wound itself (including colour of the wound, depth, size), any bleeding or fluid loss, position of the wound, and underlying cause.

Once the assessment has been made it should be possible to formulate a treatment plan.

Please note that referral to a qualified veterinarian is essential if the infection is suspected or the owner does not have the experience and confidence to deal with the wound.

Signs of Infection.

It is imperative that wounds are inspected daily for signs of infection which are:

  • Localized (around the wound site) redness, swelling.
  • Localized heat, pain. (difficult to gauge in a chinchilla because they are good at hiding pain).
  • Increased exudate (fluid coming from the wound).
  • Friable wound (delicate wound tissue – bleeds easily).
  • Odor – wound smells bad.
  • A general increase in body temperature (difficult to judge with a chinchilla).

Treatment Plans.

Wound management works on the same principles for animals as humans – research has found that the optimum environment for wound healing is one which is moist and warm. However, this is also the optimum environment for bacterial reproduction – so always check for signs of infection when treating any wound.

Never use cotton wool to clean wounds – the fibers which get left behind in the wound can slow down the wound healing and lead to increased risk of infection (fur should also be clipped away from the edges of wounds and the wound cleaned with saline for the same reason). It is also very painful to remove cotton wool fibers from a wound – Use a lint-free gauze swab.

All wounds should be monitored for changes in appearance, unusual bleeding, or infection – Veterinary advice must be sought if this is noticed.

It is not possible to go into all the variations of wounds and the care which can be given, but some suggestions of wounds and treatment regimes are as follows:

Superficial, small wounds: (e.g., Scrapes, minor cuts, minor bites)

  • Cleanse with normal saline (salt water one tablespoon in a cup of boiled, cooled water).
  • If the wound is very superficial and is small, then it can be left to heal without any treatment.
  • The wound should be monitored daily for signs of infection (as above).

Superficial, large wounds: (e.g., extensive scrapes, bites, unexplained skin lesions).

  • Cleanse with sterile water (cooled, boiled water)
  • Clip the fur away from the edge of the wound (to prevent it from getting stuck to the wound bed).
  • Apply cream to keep the surface of the wound moist (reduces pain and allows the wound to heal faster). An example of a suitable cream is green cream (bunnymail).
  • Monitor for infection and refer to vet if concerned.
  • Apply ointment/creams as prescribed by your vet.

Simple amputations (e.g., Bitten through toes)

  • Check wound for signs of bone protruding from the wound (will be creamy colored and hard). If a bone is present in the wound bed, then a veterinary opinion is essential.
  • Cleanse wound with saline
  • Monitor daily for signs of infection
  • Allow to self-heal or use ointments/creams as prescribed by your vet.

Surgical Wounds: (e.g., After abdominal surgery, castration, removal of a tumor)

  • Monitor wounds for signs of infection.
  • Monitor for signs of the chinny removing the stitches.
  • Monitor for signs of wound edges opening.
  • Veterinary opinion if required.

Bumblefoot:

  • Provide soft areas in the cage for pressure relief.
  • Check for signs of infection.
  • Spray areas with Purple Spray if required.
  • Veterinary intervention is necessary if the wounds continue to break open, bleed, or become infected.
  • Use creams as prescribed by your vet.

Cavity wounds/abscess: (cavity wound is a deep hole).

Always require veterinary intervention however the basic principles are as follows:

  • Fur should be clipped away from the wound edges (to prevent the fur from becoming stuck to the wound )
  • Flush wound with saline/irrigation fluid supplied by the vet, ensuring that all the fluid comes back out of the cavity. This may require a syringe technique which your vet should teach you.
  • If the wound is open, use a suitable gel such as IntraSite (or veterinary prescribed treatment) to keep the wound bed moist.
  • Keep the wound entrance open – this will prevent fluid from building up in the wound, causing pain, infection and further abscess.
  • Monitor the wound for signs of infection.

Cause
Abscesses are caused by infection and often are predisposed by injury. Such injuries occur when the young bite the mother while nursing. Sharp projections in the cage (especially newly constructed ones) and fighting are other causes. Filthy pens or pens that not disinfected routinely often harbor pus-producing organisms.

Treatment
Antibiotic therapy for 3 – 5 days will often eliminate the infections. If lancing is necessary, it should be done by a veterinarian, or at least you should be coached by a veterinarian. If the animal becomes ill (off feed), seek professional help. The front teeth of the young should be examined for irregularities and if present, corrective measures instituted. Sharp projections in the cage should be sought and removed if present. The cage and utensils should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.

Prevention
Prevention consists of removing the predisposing factors mentioned previously.

 

Broken Bones:

  • Isolate
  • Collar to prevent chewing
  • Seek medical attention immediately

Cause
The majority of broken bones occur in the legs, most often in the hind legs. A broken bone may be the result of a fall on a hard surface, being struck by a falling object when an animal escapes from its pen or a limb may be caught in a narrow opening and twisted. Wire bottom pens, one inch by one-half inch mesh, often allow the hock of chinchilla to go through and be caught, and a broken leg results in the struggle to get free. Improper or rough handling, such as catching or holding by the legs, can result in broken bones.

Treatment
Place the animal in an isolation pen in quiet surroundings and seek professional help. The animal should be collared to prevent chewing the broken bone. The collar should be fashioned from stiff cardboard made in two halves taped together. The difference between the inner and outer radius should be about one and one-half inches.

Prevention
Examining the door catches routinely to avoid escapes. It is suggested that 1″ x ½” mesh be avoided for the booms of pens. Learn how to retrain chinchillas properly.

Broken or Frozen Tails

Cause
A broken tail is usually caused by rough handling or closing the door on it, and a frozen tail is caused by housing during very cold weather in unheated quarters. Neither injury is considered serious.

Treatment – Breaks
House the animal alone. If no displacement has occurred, put a collar on the animal and do nothing else. Avoid handling by the tail for at least four weeks. If displacement has occurred contact your local veterinarian.

Treatment – Freezing
Usually, the tail falls off with no unfavorable results. If the chinchilla tends to chew its tail, apply a collar. It is very seldom necessary to isolate these animals. Antibiotics may be used to prevent secondary infection.

Torn Ears and Head Injuries

Cause
Fights.

Treatment
Place the animals in separate cages and watch them closely. The torn areas should be clipped of fur, washed with soap and water and rinsed with a mild disinfectant. In some cases, it may be necessary to give penicillin. Sever injuries should be attended to by a veterinarian. Uneventful healing usually occurs if the above measures are carefully carried out. The pens and utensils must be kept clean. If infection occurs, bathing two or three times daily with warm salty water will cleanse and hence assist healing of the wound.

Prevention
When introducing strange animals to the breeding herd, patience and caution must be exercised. The new animal should be allowed to get used to his new quarters before coming in contact with other animals.

Some mechanical means of closing the male out of the female pen should be available and used at the first sign of fighting. If fighting again occurs separate them. Usually, two or three instances of this teaches the lesson. However, a vicious male may be put in a separate pen for several months and then tried again.

Vicious fighting is not necessary and should not be tolerated.

 

Broken Teeth:

Cause
This is usually caused by jumping to the floor from a high cage during an escape attempt where the animal us alone or when you are attempting to catch it. As a rule, only the front teeth (incisors) are broken. Sometimes the teeth become caught in the wire mesh and are broken in the struggle to be free.

Treatment
If only one tooth is broken, file down the sharp points. If two or more are broken, clip them off evenly and file smooth. Put the animal on a soft diet until normal mastication can be resumed. It may be necessary to isolate the animal.

Heat Prostration:

Cause
Excessively high temperatures, poor ventilation, insufficient water and often direct exposure to the sunlight.

Treatment
If the animal is unconscious and has a high temperature, place it in a cool place and lower the chinchilla’s temperature to normal but not below (99-101°F). When it revives, give it a few drops of cool, slightly salted water. If the temperature becomes sub-normal, the treatment should be reversed, and attempts made to conserve body heat and restore the temperature to normal.

Prevention
Proper housing and air-conditioning.

Swollen Penis:

Cause
A ring of hair behind the glans of the penis following mating.

Treatment
Isolate and put a collar on the animal. Remove the fur, apply vaseline and massage the penis very gently in an attempt to reduce the swelling. Apply an antibiotic ointment three or four times daily.

Prevention
Males that are in polygamous breeding set-up should be examined at any sign of irritation.

 

Eye Injuries:

Causes
Usually projection of wire or splinters of wood in the eye. This is seen most frequently when new cages and nest boxes have been built recently.

Treatment
Isolate, and if the injury is severe or the foreign body is still present, seek veterinary assistance. If the injury is moderate and there is no foreign body present, an antibiotic ointment should be put in the eye twice daily until recovery occurs.

Prevention
Check for and remove any harmful projections in the pen.

 

I hope that this proves of interest and is helpful.

Please note ALL bite wounds should be referred for veterinary intervention. Bite wounds may look superficial at the surface but may be fatal if left untreated – there is a serious risk of abscessation, deep tissue trauma, infection, and rapid deterioration and death due to severe shock. ALL chins with bite injuries must be treated for shock and taken for immediate veterinary advice.

 

Reference:

T. J. Pridham, D.V.M., circa 1969

What Do Chinchillas Need In Their Cage?

What Do Chinchillas Need In Their Cage

Chinchillas are naturally playful and cheeky little pets, but this wonderful friendly nature will only come out if you set up your Chinchilla’s living environment so that it is as happy as it can be. A depressed Chinchilla does not make a good pet! Part of making your Chinchilla happy is setting up their cage with some basic chinchilla cage accessories.

The bare minimum that your Chinchillas needs are a durable and safe exercise wheel, a water bottle that’s easy to clean, a food dish and hay rack that they can not be knocked over, cage toys and an adequately sized cage that is properly placed within your home.  Here is a list of items I use:

Size of Chinchilla Cage

Without a doubt, this is the most important tip for Chinchilla cages. Just like human beings we all want our house to be as large and as big as possible, money permitting of course! Well, Chinchillas are absolutely no different, so depending on the money you are able and willing to spend on your Chinchilla cage, it is always advisable to buy the biggest, largest size of Chinchilla cage your money will buy you. Chinchillas don’t necessarily need a mansion but they are very active pets who love to jump from branch to branch.

Choosing the Best Chinchilla Wheel

No matter what the size of Chinchilla cage you have buying a Chinchilla wheel, also known as Chinchilla exercise wheel enables your Chinchilla to run and run until it’s little legs are absolutely exhausted. A Chinchilla wheel in effect makes even a small Chinchilla cage bigger by enabling the Chinchilla to exercise itself and remain fit and healthy. What happens with the Chinchilla wheel is that it spins and the Chinchilla runs on top of it or inside it. The wheel is ideal if you are unable to allow your Chinchilla outside its cage very often. (note: Chins need out of their cage every day for a minimum of 30 minutes!)

Bottles and Feeders

Make sure you have a bottle which allows your Chinchilla to drink as often as it cares to. Keeping your Chinchilla hydrated is absolutely essential for its health and well-being. Remember that Chinchillas will chew anything in sight so glass bottles are best or metal tipped bottles that hang on the outside of the cage. For feeding your Chinchilla, make sure that the food bowl is ceramic or glass as once again a plastic one will soon be eaten by your Chinchilla which actually could kill it if it ingests the plastics. Ideally attach hopper-style feeders to the outside of the cage for ease filling, changing and cleaning.

Placement of the Chinchilla Cage

Many people mistakenly put their Chinchilla cage where they can see it on a regular basis. Many people end up putting their cage in the lounge or living room where they spend much of their time. This environment is actually bad for your Chinchilla because there is lots of noise either from your family or from the television. In all honesty, the best place for your Chinchilla cage is in a quiet area where they may have peace and quiet and not suffer from stress and shocks. Don’t forget to not put the cage in a cold, overly hot or draughty area. Chinchillas appreciate a regular temperature which is not susceptible to regular changes.

Chinchilla Toys

Once again Chinchillas can certainly be like human beings. As human beings, we love to play and be entertained. Your Chinchilla is the same. So once again when it comes to your Chinchilla cage make sure the contains a number of toys and activities to keep your Chinchilla stimulated and busy. There are a whole host of accessories which you can buy for your Chinchilla cage. Chew toys are especially good because your Chinchilla does need to grind its teeth down, so these are practical as well as for pleasure. Look for safe-wood chew toys, hanging parrot toys with bells, tubes, boxes, and swings. There are many more, but that should get you started. If you are unsure what is or is not safe-wood for your Chinchilla, please read “What Are Some Chinchilla Safe Wood for Chews, Shelves, And Toys

 

 

DIY Chinchilla Cage ~ BATMAN – ROBIN – JOKER

DIY Chinchilla Cage-cage

THE STORY

It happened last year in December when I was busy chatting in a local BBS, that one of the chatters asked for someone who might like to get two Chinchillas for free because his meant to be male chin has proven to be female and has given birth to two young chinnies. As I’m fond of animals in common (I’ve had a dog, a cat, a horse, and some fish at home) and of chinchillas in special ever since I met one at my friends home, I simply ignored all the voices in my head who whispered that my flat was too small, my time too short and my electronic stuff too valuable to get some pets which look like exploded mice and behave like critters.

Batman & Robin

Alas, four weeks and several-chin related books later I went to the chatter to give two of his four furballs a new home. The owner introduced me to two male chinchillas, a standard grey which was 9 months old and a half black velvet at the age of 5 months. For a few bucks, I also got a large cage and some equipment (the chins came for free) and went home… as the proud owner of the grey “Batman” and the black “Robin”. Within the next days, I came to the conclusion that…

  • Batman and Robin are girls and
  • …I needed a larger cage to compensate my jumping balls’ energy.

The following weeks I devoted my time to the observation of the furry things hopping around in their new (self-made) cage and in my flat. Despite my skepticism, Robin and Batman went along fine with each other… they cooperate in any respects: They share a bed (sometimes their sleeping positions remind me of the Indian “Kamasutra”), pellets and any unhealthy thing B they find… usually power cables, pieces of wallpaper or sheets of paper. To get these things, they developed a special strategy:

  1. The deliberate, cunning Batman (she’s the elder one and a born leader) distracts my attention while
  2. the hectic bouncing ball Robin gets the desired object and transports it into the cage (which is a quite difficult task sometimes).
  3. Batman suddenly turns around and hops into the cage and
  4. my Chinchillas enjoy their quarry (usually in the only corner of the cage which cannot be reached without effort).

Normally the two Ladies are pretty arrogant and standoffish towards me… they won’t let me touch or scratch them… unless… yes, unless I will offer some raisins… typical female. 😉

Joker

In June I saw a gray male baby chin in a pet store (he was 3 months old, small and all alone without any sitting boards or other Chinchillas in his tiny glass cage) and I decided to get a mate for my two Ladies. I took him with me and named him Joker.

Unfortunately, my Ladies do not (yet) like him very much; in fact, they tend to chase him away every time he approaches… but this only happens when they are closed up in one cage… once all three Chinchillas run free, there’s no hostility… they just ignore each other. So I put Joker in my second chin cage, in plain sight of the Ladies cage. Who knows … maybe the time will come (when he’s grown up), when Robin’s and Batman’s point of view will change… 😉

Unlike the females, Joker is very affectionate. He enjoys to be scratched under the chin, likes it to jump around my boyfriend’s and my feet and sometimes he even lets us hold and pet him… for a few moments and a raisin.

THE PICTURES

So here you can see a few pictures of my beloved fur balls… boy it took a great deal of action for me to catch them standing still enough for taking a picture. Finally, I gave up and went back to the old “My chinnies want some raisins?”-trick.

 

DIY Chinchilla Cage-cage

The Cage

This is a scheme of my self-built chin cage (the one where Batman and Robin live in)… it seems to be a standard procedure to build a cage by your own when you get Chinchillas; either you build a large cage and let them out for supervised exercises once a day (app. 1 hour) or you buy a standard pet cage (the hugest and probably most expensive you find) and let the critters out for half of the night… eating up your house.

This cage has a height of 150 cm, a width of 100 cm and a depth of 50 cm. It is totally built from wood and has a wire mesh at the front side with two large doors in it. The edges of the boards are additionally bite-protected by aluminum strips and the floor is covered by first newspapers then pine shavings, which are changed every two weeks (there is a drawer to make cleaning easier). For their teeth and also for climbing exercises, I secretly took a big branch from my mother’s holy cherry tree when she was not there to forbid it… the chins love it. 🙂

The upper half of the cage can be separated by inserting a small board… maybe I will need it once my two Lady-chins give birth to babies… who knows. As you can see, my chin house has two entries (like the ones from Rene), because otherwise Batman tends to block the only entry and Robin has to start a fight every time she wants to get in or out.

For my little male Joker I chose the second way (the one with the expensive cage and the ripped-to-shreds power cords, books and door frames) because after all, I still had the cage in which my females arrived. I think it is big enough for one chin, especially when you consider the fact that Joker is allowed to run free from ca. 21.00 to 2.00 every night.

 

 

Article & Photo Credit: Vera L. , Thank you very much!

 

 

DIY Chinchilla Cages ~ Office Filing Cabinet ~ Cheap Chinchilla Cage!!

DIY-Chinchilla-Cage-1

We have two identical large cages for our chinchillas, plus two smaller ones. They are actually office filing cabinets, with the sliding doors removed. If you add a wire mesh front, and slide-out litter trays, the result will be perfect.

The big ones are 1.50 meters (4″11′) wide, 1 meter (3″3′) high, 0.5 meter (1″8′) deep.

We feel this type of cage has the following advantages :

  • The mess the chinchillas make is better contained inside the cage, compared to one that is completely made of wire mesh.
  • They are much easier to clean.
  • Our chins feel safer inside this cage. Their instinct still warns them of all movement around them, and this way they don’t see as much.
  • Because they are attached to the wall, we can easily stand in front of the cage and lean inside, allowing them to play on our head and shoulders.
  • And with a simple board of wood, they can still climb down and run around on the floor.

And now for the pictures :

DIY-Chinchilla-Cage-1
One of our two cages. Tante Truus is awake, the others are still sleeping. The picture is not too clear, but it will give an idea of the size of the thing.

The cage is not completely done yet. We want to add a big branch from a fruit tree or whatever. The mesh panel in the center is a door, so we can easily access every part of the cage for cleaning or to pick up one of the chinchillas. The sleeping house has two openings. I did this, because they used to fight a little in their old house about who could sit in front of the one opening that one had.

As you can see, the cages are attached to the walls, so we can look the chins ‘in the eye’. The piece of wood you can almost see in the back of the room is ‘the ladder’ they use to climb up and down if we let them run free.

DIY-Chinchilla-Cage-2
An overview of our ‘chin room’.

And here is another silly picture I found : a detail of the sleep house. Even with two openings, it can be hard to get out of the house ! Note the depth of the litter pan.

DIY-Chinchilla-Cage-3
And this is the third and smaller cage. We use it to house a couple of chins we want to breed or if the female is getting close to giving birth. This picture also shows how we clean the litter trays. The wire you see was part of the Christmas decorations and is not a permanent setup.

DIY-Chinchilla-Cage-4
I got a lot of email from people asking me to show more constructional details. OK, for those interested…..
DIY-Chinchilla-Cage-5
This is another overview of one of the chins cages, giving an idea of the size of it. Note Sammy getting out of the last cage to go for a walk.
DIY-Chinchilla-Cage-6
Having suspended cages opened the need for an alternative way to let the chins run free. This works well for us. We always send the cats out of the room when the chins are released, we never trust them near our furballs.
DIY-Chinchilla-Cage-7

 

 

Article & Photo Credit: Rene and Bernice, Thank you both!

Do You have a DIY Chinchilla Cage? Why not send in the details and have it published right here on Chinchilla Stuff?

DIY Chinchilla Hammock – Super Easy Hammock For Your Chin

DIY-Chinchilla-Hammock-

Want to make super easy hammocks for your chin?

  1. Get 1″ diameter ring binder rings from an office supply store,
  2. Buy a half yard to a yard of fleece,
  3. Cut a large triangle out of fleece,
  4. Poke a hole in each corner,
  5. Open up the ring binder rings,
  6. Put a ring binder ring through each hole
  7. Attach to the corner of the cage with the ring binder rings.

DIY-Chinchilla-Hammock

Chinchilla Colors… Part 2 – Chinchilla Genetics Chart

Chinchilla-colors-genetics-chart

Part 1 can be found here: Chinchilla Colors, Classification And Basic Genetics

Chinchilla Genetics Chart

One thing to remember when breeding chinchillas is that there is a lethal factor.  The two genes with a lethal factor are white and TOV (touch of velvet).  The lethal factor means that you with have 25% less offspring born to that pairing.  Below are some possible outcomes from pairings.  Hetero is short for heterozygous and means that that animal carries one dominant and one recessive gene.  Homo stands for homozygous and means that that animal carries either two dominant or two recessive genes.


chinchilla-color-standard
Baby Standard ©

Standard mated to:

 

Standard
· 100% Standard

Black Velvet
· 50% Black Velvet
· 50% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Standard

Homo Beige
· 100% Hetero Beige

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero)

White Mosaic
· 50% White Mosaic
· 50% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Pink White

Violet
· 100% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 100% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 50% Light Ebony
· 50% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 50% Light Ebony
· 25% Medium Ebony
· 25% Standard
Dark Ebony
· 37.5% Light Ebony
· 37.5% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Dark Ebony
· 12.5% Standard
Extra Dark Ebony
· 37.5% Medium Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% Dark Ebony
· 6.25% Extra Dark Ebony
· 6.25% Standard

^


chinchilla colors black-velvet
Black Velvet ©

Black Velvet mated to:

Standard
· 50% Black Velvet
· 50% Standard

Black Velvet
· 50% Black Velvet
· 25% Standard
· 25% Fatal

Hetero Beige
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Standard

Homo Beige
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero)

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Fatal
· 12 1/2% Hetero Beige
· 12 1/2% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Fatal

White Mosaic
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% TOV White
· 25% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% TOV White
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 25% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

Violet
· 50% Black Velvet, Violet Carrier
· 50% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 50% Black Velvet, Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% Light TOV Ebony
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 25% Light TOV Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Medium TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium TOV Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 18.75% Light TOV Ebony
· 18.75% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark TOV Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 6.25% Black Velvet
· 6.25% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium TOV Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Light TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Dark TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Extra Dark TOV Ebony
· 3.13% Extra Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Black Velvet
· 3.13% Standard

^


Chinchilla Colors Hetero Beige
Baby Hetero Beige ©

Hetero Beige mated to:

Standard
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Standard

Black Velvet
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Standard

Homo Beige
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Homo Beige

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Homo Beige
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Homo)

White Mosaic
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% Homo Beige
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)

Violet
· 50% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier
· 50% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 50% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 18.75% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 6.25% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 3.13% Extra Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Hetero Beige
· 3.13% Standard

^


Chinchilla Colors Homo Beige
Homo Beige

Homo Beige mated to:

Standard
· 100% Hetero Beige

Black Velvet
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero)

Hetero Beige
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Homo Beige

Homo Beige
· 100% Homo Beige

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Homo)

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 50% Homo Beige
· 50% Brown Velvet (Homo)

White Mosaic
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Pink White (Hetero)

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 50% Homo Beige
· 50% Pink White (Homo)

Violet
· 100% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 100% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 50% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 50% Hetero Beige

Medium Ebony
· 50% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

Dark Ebony
· 37.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 37.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

Extra Dark Ebony
· 37.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 6.25% Hetero Beige

^


Chinchilla Colors brown-velvet
Brown Velvet

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige) mated to:

Standard
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Standard

Black Velvet
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Fatal
· 12 1/2% Hetero Beige
· 12 1/2% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Homo Beige
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Homo Beige
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Homo)

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Fatal
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 6.25% Homo Beige
· 6.25% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Fatal
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Homo Beige

White Mosaic
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% TOV White
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% TOV Pink White (Homo)
· 6.25% Pink White (Homo)
· 6.25% TOV White
· 6.25% White Mosaic
· 6.25% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 6.25% Homo Beige
· 6.25% Black Velvet
· 6.25% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 12.5% Homo Beige
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

Violet
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero), Violet Carrier
· 25% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier
· 25% Black Velvet, Violet Carrier
· 25% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero), Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Black Velvet, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 12.5% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Light TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 6.25% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% Medium TOV Ebony
· 6.25% Medium Ebony
· 6.25% Black Velvet
· 6.25% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 9.38% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium TOV Ebony
· 9.38% Medium Ebony
· 9.38% Light TOV Ebony
· 9.38% Light Ebony
· 3.13% Dark TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% Dark TOV Ebony
· 3.13% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 3.13% Hetero Beige
· 3.13% Black Velvet
· 3.13% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 9.38% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium TOV Ebony
· 9.38% Medium Ebony
· 6.25% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Light TOV Ebony
· 6.25% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark TOV Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 1.56% TOV Chocolate (Hetero)
· 1.56% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 1.56% Extra Dark TOV Ebony
· 1.56% Extra Dark Ebony
· 1.56% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 1.56% Hetero Beige
· 1.56% Black Velvet
· 1.56% Standard

^


Brown Velvet (Homo Beige) mated to:

Standard
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero)

Black Velvet
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Fatal

Hetero Beige
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Brown Velvet (Homo)

Homo Beige
· 50% Homo Beige
· 50% Brown Velvet (Homo)

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Fatal
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Homo Beige

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 50% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Fatal

White Mosaic
· 25% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 12.5% Homo Beige
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 25% TOV Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 25% Homo Beige

Violet
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero), Violet Carrier
· 50% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero), Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 25% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

Medium Ebony
· 25% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 6.25% Hetero Beige

Extra Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% TOV Chocolate (Hetero)
· 3.13% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 3.13% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 3.13% Hetero Beige

^


chinchilla-color-White Mosaic
White Mosaic ©

White Mosaic mated to:

Standard
· 50% White Mosaic
· 50% Standard

Black Velvet
· 25% TOV White
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Standard

Homo Beige
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Pink White (Hetero)

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% TOV White
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 25% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

White Mosaic
· 50% White Mosaic
· 25% Standard
· 25% Fatal

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Fatal
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 50% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Fatal

Violet
· 50% White Mosaic, Violet Carrier
· 50% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 50% White Mosaic, Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony White
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony White
· 25% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Medium Ebony White
· 12.5% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Ebony White
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 18.75% Light Ebony White
· 18.75% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Ebony White
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 6.25% White Mosaic
· 6.25% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Ebony White
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Light Ebony White
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Dark Ebony White
· 12.5% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Extra Dark Ebony White
· 3.13% Extra Dark Ebony
· 3.13% White Mosaic
· 3.13% Standard

^


chinchilla colors pink-white
Pink White ©

Pink White (Hetero Beige) mated to:

Standard
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Standard

Black Velvet
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% TOV White
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% Homo Beige
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Standard

Homo Beige
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% TOV Pink White (Homo)
· 6.25% Pink White (Homo)
· 6.25% TOV White
· 6.25% White Mosaic
· 6.25% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 6.25% Homo Beige
· 6.25% Black Velvet
· 6.25% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 12.5% Homo Beige
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

White Mosaic
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Fatal
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Fatal
· 12.5% Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% Homo Beige
· 6.25% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 25% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Fatal
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Homo Beige

Violet
· 25% Pink White (Hetero), Violet Carrier
· 25% White Mosaic, Violet Carrier
· 25% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier
· 25% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 25% Pink White (Hetero), Sapphire Carrier
· 25% White Mosaic, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 12.5% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Ebony White
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Ebony White
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Medium Ebony White
· 6.25% Medium Ebony
· 6.25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 6.25% White Mosaic
· 6.25% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 9.38% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 9.38% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Light Ebony White
· 9.38% Light Ebony
· 9.38% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Ebony White
· 9.38% Medium Ebony
· 3.13% Dark Tan White (Hetero)
· 3.13% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% Dark Ebony White
· 3.13% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Pink White (Hetero)
· 3.13% White Mosaic
· 3.13% Hetero Beige
· 3.13% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 9.38% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Ebony White
· 9.38% Medium Ebony
· 6.25% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Light Ebony White
· 6.25% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Tan White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Ebony White
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 1.56% Chocolate White (Hetero)
· 1.56% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 1.56% Extra Dark Ebony White
· 1.56% Extra Dark Ebony
· 1.56% Pink White (Hetero)
· 1.56% White Mosaic
· 1.56% Hetero Beige
· 1.56% Standard

^


Pink White (Homo Beige) mated to:

Standard
· 50% Hetero Beige
· 50% Pink White

Black Velvet
· 25% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

Hetero Beige
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)

Homo Beige
· 50% Homo Beige
· 50% Pink White (Homo)

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% Pink White (Homo)
· 12.5% TOV Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 12.5% Homo Beige
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 25% TOV Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Homo)
· 25% Homo Beige

White Mosaic
· 50% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Fatal

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Fatal
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Homo Beige

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 50% Pink White (Homo)
· 25% Homo Beige
· 25% Fatal

Violet
· 50% Pink White (Hetero), Violet Carrier
· 50% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 50% Pink White (Hetero), Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 25% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

Medium Ebony
· 25% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 18.75% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Hetero Beige

Extra Dark Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% Chocolate White (Hetero)
· 3.13% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 3.13% Pink White (Hetero)
· 3.13% Hetero Beige

^


chinchilla colors violet.
Violet ©

Violet mated to:

Standard
· 100% Standard, Violet Carrier

Black Velvet
· 50% Black Velvet, Violet Carrier
· 50% Standard, Violet Carrier

Hetero Beige
· 50% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier
· 50% Standard, Violet Carrier

Homo Beige
· 100% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero), Violet Carrier
· 25% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier
· 25% Black Velvet, Violet Carrier
· 25% Standard, Violet Carrier

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero), Violet Carrier
· 50% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier

White Mosaic
· 50% White Mosaic, Violet Carrier
· 50% Standard, Violet Carrier

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero), Violet Carrier
· 25% White Mosaic, Violet Carrier
· 25% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier
· 25% Standard, Violet Carrier

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 50% Pink White (Hetero), Violet Carrier
· 50% Hetero Beige, Violet Carrier

Violet
· 100% Violet

Sapphire
· 100% Standard, Violet-Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 50% Light Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 50% Standard, Violet Carrier

Medium Ebony
· 50% Light Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 25% Medium Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 25% Standard, Violet Carrier

Dark Ebony
· 37.5% Light Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 37.5% Medium Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 12.5% Dark Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 12.5% Standard, Violet Carrier

Extra Dark Ebony
· 37.5% Medium Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 25% Light Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 25% Dark Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 6.25% Extra Dark Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 6.25% Standard, Violet Carrier

^


Sapphire mated to:

Standard
· 100% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Black Velvet
· 50% Black Velvet, Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Hetero Beige
· 50% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Homo Beige
· 100% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero), Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Black Velvet, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 50% Brown Velvet (Hetero), Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier

White Mosaic
· 50% White Mosaic, Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero), Sapphire Carrier
· 25% White Mosaic, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 50% Pink White (Hetero), Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Hetero Beige, Sapphire Carrier

Violet
· 100% Standard, Violet-Sapphire Carrier

Sapphire
· 100% Sapphire

Light Ebony
· 50% Light Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Medium Ebony
· 50% Light Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Medium Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Dark Ebony
· 37.5% Light Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 37.5% Medium Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 12.5% Dark Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 12.5% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Extra Dark Ebony
· 37.5% Medium Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Light Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Dark Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 6.25% Extra Dark Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 6.25% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

^


chinchilla colors ebony-white
Ebony White ©

Light Ebony mated to:

Standard
· 50% Light Ebony
· 50% Standard

Black Velvet
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% Light TOV Ebony
· 25% Black Velvet
· 25% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% Hetero Beige
· 25% Standard

Homo Beige
· 50% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 50% Hetero Beige

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Light TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 25% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

White Mosaic
· 25% Light Ebony White
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% White Mosaic
· 25% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Ebony White
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 25% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

Violet
· 50% Light Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 50% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 50% Light Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 50% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 33.3% Light Ebony
· 33.3% Medium Ebony
· 33.3% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 33.3% Medium Ebony
· 33.3% Light Ebony
· 16.7% Dark Ebony
· 16.7% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 33.3% Medium Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% Dark Ebony
· 8.3% Extra Dark Ebony
· 8.3% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 29.2% Medium Ebony
· 29.2% Dark Ebony
· 20.8% Extra Dark Ebony
· 16.7% Light Ebony
· 4.1% Standard

^


Medium Ebony mated to:

Standard
· 50% Light Ebony
· 25% Medium Ebony
· 25% Standard

Black Velvet
· 25% Light TOV Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Medium TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Black Velvet
· 12.5% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Hetero Beige
· 12.5% Standard

Homo Beige
· 50% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Hetero Beige

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 6.25% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% Medium TOV Ebony
· 6.25% Medium Ebony
· 6.25% Black Velvet
· 6.25% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 25% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

White Mosaic
· 25% Light Ebony White
· 25% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Medium Ebony White
· 12.5% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% White Mosaic
· 12.5% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 12.5% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Ebony White
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Medium Ebony White
· 6.25% Medium Ebony
· 6.25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 6.25% White Mosaic
· 6.25% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 25% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Pink White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

Violet
· 50% Light Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 25% Medium Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 25% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 50% Light Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Medium Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 33.3% Medium Ebony
· 33.3% Light Ebony
· 16.7% Dark Ebony
· 16.7% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 33.3% Medium Ebony
· 22.2% Light Ebony
· 22.2% Dark Ebony
· 11.1% Extra Dark Ebony
· 11.1% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 27.8% Medium Ebony
· 27.8% Dark Ebony
· 22.2% Extra Dark Ebony
· 16.7% Light Ebony
· 5.6% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 36.1% Extra Dark Ebony
· 27.8% Dark Ebony
· 22.2% Medium Ebony
· 11.1% Light Ebony
· 2.8% Standard

^


Dark Ebony mated to:

Standard
· 37.5% Light Ebony
· 37.5% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Dark Ebony
· 12.5% Standard

Black Velvet
· 18.75% Medium TOV Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 18.75% Light TOV Ebony
· 18.75% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark TOV Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 6.25% Black Velvet
· 6.25% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 18.75% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 6.25% Hetero Beige
· 6.25% Standard

Homo Beige
· 37.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 37.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Hetero Beige

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 9.38% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium TOV Ebony
· 9.38% Medium Ebony
· 9.38% Light TOV Ebony
· 9.38% Light Ebony
· 3.13% Dark TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% Dark TOV Ebony
· 3.13% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 3.13% Hetero Beige
· 3.13% Black Velvet
· 3.13% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 18.75% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 6.25% Hetero Beige

White Mosaic
· 18.75% Medium Ebony White
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 18.75% Light Ebony White
· 18.75% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Ebony White
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 6.25% White Mosaic
· 6.25% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 9.38% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 9.38% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Light Ebony White
· 9.38% Light Ebony
· 9.38% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Ebony White
· 9.38% Medium Ebony
· 3.13% Dark Tan White (Hetero)
· 3.13% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% Dark Ebony White
· 3.13% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Pink White (Hetero)
· 3.13% White Mosaic
· 3.13% Hetero Beige
· 3.13% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 18.75% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 18.75% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Pink White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Hetero Beige

Violet
· 37.5% Light Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 37.5% Medium Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 12.5% Dark Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 12.5% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 37.5% Light Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 37.5% Medium Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 12.5% Dark Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 12.5% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 33.3% Medium Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% Dark Ebony
· 8.3% Extra Dark Ebony
· 8.3% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 27.8% Medium Ebony
· 27.8% Dark Ebony
· 22.2% Extra Dark Ebony
· 16.7% Light Ebony
· 5.6% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 37% Extra Dark Ebony
· 26% Dark Ebony
· 22.2% Medium Ebony
· 11.1% Light Ebony
· 3.7% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 50% Extra Dark Ebony
· 24.1% Dark Ebony
· 16.7% Medium Ebony
· 7.4% Light Ebony
· 1.8% Standard

^


Extra Dark Ebony mated to:

Standard
· 37.5% Medium Ebony
· 25% Light Ebony
· 25% Dark Ebony
· 6.25% Extra Dark Ebony
· 6.25% Standard

Black Velvet
· 18.75% Medium TOV Ebony
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Light TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Dark TOV Ebony
· 12.5% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Extra Dark TOV Ebony
· 3.13% Extra Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Black Velvet
· 3.13% Standard

Hetero Beige
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 3.13% Extra Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Hetero Beige
· 3.13% Standard

Homo Beige
· 37.5% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 6.25% Hetero Beige

Brown Velvet (Hetero Beige)
· 9.38% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium TOV Ebony
· 9.38% Medium Ebony
· 6.25% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Light TOV Ebony
· 6.25% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark TOV Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 1.56% TOV Chocolate (Hetero)
· 1.56% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 1.56% Extra Dark TOV Ebony
· 1.56% Extra Dark Ebony
· 1.56% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 1.56% Hetero Beige
· 1.56% Black Velvet
· 1.56% Standard

Brown Velvet (Homo Beige)
· 18.75% Medium TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark TOV Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% TOV Chocolate (Hetero)
· 3.13% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 3.13% Brown Velvet (Hetero)
· 3.13% Hetero Beige

White Mosaic
· 18.75% Medium Ebony White
· 18.75% Medium Ebony
· 12.5% Light Ebony White
· 12.5% Light Ebony
· 12.5% Dark Ebony White
· 12.5% Dark Ebony
· 3.13% Extra Dark Ebony White
· 3.13% Extra Dark Ebony
· 3.13% White Mosaic
· 3.13% Standard

Pink White (Hetero Beige)
· 9.38% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 9.38% Medium Ebony White
· 9.38% Medium Ebony
· 6.25% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Light Ebony White
· 6.25% Light Ebony
· 6.25% Dark Tan White (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 6.25% Dark Ebony White
· 6.25% Dark Ebony
· 1.56% Chocolate White (Hetero)
· 1.56% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 1.56% Extra Dark Ebony White
· 1.56% Extra Dark Ebony
· 1.56% Pink White (Hetero)
· 1.56% White Mosaic
· 1.56% Hetero Beige
· 1.56% Standard

Pink White (Homo Beige)
· 18.75% Medium Tan White (Hetero)
· 18.75% Medium Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Light Tan (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Tan White (Hetero)
· 12.5% Dark Tan (Hetero)
· 3.13% Chocolate White (Hetero)
· 3.13% Chocolate (Hetero)
· 3.13% Pink White (Hetero)
· 3.13% Hetero Beige

Violet
· 37.5% Medium Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 25% Light Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 25% Dark Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 6.25% Extra Dark Ebony, Violet Carrier
· 6.25% Standard, Violet Carrier

Sapphire
· 37.5% Medium Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Light Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 25% Dark Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 6.25% Extra Dark Ebony, Sapphire Carrier
· 6.25% Standard, Sapphire Carrier

Light Ebony
· 29.2% Medium Ebony
· 29.2% Dark Ebony
· 20.8% Extra Dark Ebony
· 16.7% Light Ebony
· 4.1% Standard

Medium Ebony
· 36.1% Extra Dark Ebony
· 27.8% Dark Ebony
· 22.2% Medium Ebony
· 11.1% Light Ebony
· 2.8% Standard

Dark Ebony
· 50% Extra Dark Ebony
· 24.1% Dark Ebony
· 16.7% Medium Ebony
· 7.4% Light Ebony
· 1.8% Standard

Extra Dark Ebony
· 61.7% Extra Dark Ebony
· 19.8% Dark Ebony
· 12.4% Medium Ebony
· 4.9% Light Ebony
· 1.2% Standard

^

chinchilla colors dark-tan
Dark Tan ©
Chinchilla Colors TOV-Dark-Tan
TOV-Dark-Tan ©

Classification and Systematics of Chinchillas

There is much confusion relating to the classification of the different species (or sub-species) of chinchillas. Different terminologies and the blurring of time have resulted in rather a complicated tangle of dual-naming and cultural differences.

I am not attempting to either clarify or put any records straight, indeed, my research may be equally flawed, but I shall attempt merely to catalog the following, in the hope that someone may find it of interest.

  • Latin Scientific Name: Chinchilla Chinchilla brevicaudata (1848)
  • Classification History: Eriomys chinchilla (1829) – Lagostomus laniger (1831) – Chinchilla brevicaudata (major) (1879)
  • Common Names: True, Greater short-tailed chinchilla, Precious, Royal, La Chinchilla Real, Peruvian Chinchilla, La Chinchilla Indiana.
  • Distinguishing Features: This species has the shortest tail and ears relative to body length.
  • Latin Scientific Name: Chinchilla Chinchilla boliviana (1911)
  • Classification History: Chinchilla boliviana (1911) – Chinchilla intermedia (1939)
  • Common Names: La Chinchilla del Altiplano, Boliviano, Brevicaudata (called this by early ranchers), La Chinchilla Cordillerana, Mountain, Bolivian, Lesser Short-Tailed Chinchilla, La Plata, Argentine, Cordilleras Chinchilla.
  • Latin Scientific Name: Chinchilla lanigera (1782)
  • Classification History: Mus laniger (1782) – Cricetus chinchilla (1814) – Chinchilla velligera (1934) – Lommus lanigera (1803) – Cricetus lanigera (1822)
  • Common Names: Velligera, La Chinchilla Bastarda, Hybrid, Lesser, Coastal, La Chinchilla Costina, La Chinchilla Chilena, Long-Tailed Chinchilla.
  • Apparently, a chap called De Chant found several different “types” of Chinchilla lanigera.

La Plata Type: Denser bone structure, heavy-set, roundish and compact. Short, wide head. Larger animal.

Costina Type: Lighter bone structure (in comparison). Longer hind legs. Lighter, thinner build, with a narrower more pointed head.

Raton Type: Similar to the La Plata type, but about a third smaller.

The above information on “types” is relatively academic now, as many decades of selective breeding has “blended” the distinct body shapes into hybrid “types”, displaying the characteristics that the breeders wanted. However, you do occasionally see a chinchilla that easily fits in with one of the above descriptions.

Once again, may I reiterate that although it is fun to breed some of the stunning colors that are available today, please do so with the health of future generations in mind. Some recessive mutations tend to produce weak and small offspring. They, therefore, require out-crossing to BIG, TOP QUALITY Standards whenever possible. NEVER breed from any chinchilla that has had dental problems within its bloodline. Fur-chewers (a vice) should also be excluded from a breeding programme if possible.

What Do Chinchillas Eat? Diet, Food, Treats & More

what do chinchillas eat - feeding vegetables

If you’re thinking about getting a pet chinchilla, one of the most important things for you to consider is diet. To allow your pet to live a long and happy life, you need to make sure he or she is getting the right nutrients to not only survive but thrive. Chinchillas are unique animals with extremely sensitive digestive systems which need special care to avoid health problems.

A Healthy Chinchilla Diet

Did you know that chinchillas are primarily herbivores? Their diet in the wild would be primarily made up of seeds, roots, and leaves although they have been observed eating insects and small bird eggs. In captivity, chinchillas do best with a completely herbivorous diet. A chinchilla’s owner needs to focus on providing adequate nutrition to help their chinchilla thrive and live a long, healthy life.

Chinchillas can be fed pellets, but that alone is not enough for a healthy diet. They should also be offered unlimited amounts of hay on a daily basis. Pellets should be chinchilla-quality. High-quality chinchilla pellets should include a carefully balanced nutritional ratio: 16-20% protein, 2-5% fat, and 15-35% fiber. Their diets should also include healthy servings of vitamins A, D, and E.

Try to avoid food mixes: chinchillas are prone to picking out what they like most from a mix, and that could be a dangerous habit! If they’re not eating the entire mix, they will miss out on necessary nutrition. Most chinchillas should be fed approximately two tablespoons of pellets per day: one tablespoon in the morning and one tablespoon at night, times when they would naturally feed. Make sure to put it in a small dish to keep it from getting soiled or spilled!

Avoid substituting chinchilla-quality pellets for pellets made for other animals, such as guinea pigs or rabbits. These foods will typically not include the necessary nutritional values for the care of a sensitive chinchilla, and worse, it could cause health problems such as liver damage.

Chinchilla Diet No Rabbit Pellets
Chinchilla and rabbit pellets may look similar, but they have different ingredients and nutritional value. Photo credit: Andreas Rühle

A controversial topic for chinchilla diets is corn: some owners choose to feed pellets that include corn in the ingredients while others feel it causes bloating or digestive issues. It is generally recommended that owners avoid pellets or treats that have corn listed in the first few ingredients. Most pellets will include corn, so it’s almost impossible to avoid it all together, but higher quality foods will contain smaller amounts.

In the wild, chinchillas’ diets would include a large amount of roughage, a material found in vegetables that assist with digestion. Therefore, in addition to pellets, you should be offering your chinchilla hay for their overall health and to help mimic the diet that chinchillas would feed off of in their natural environment. It also helps keep their teeth healthy!

Chinchillas should be offered loose hay rather than hay in cubed form. Different types of hay contain different amounts of protein, and a hay mixture is likely to be your best bet to provide the highest quality food for your pet. Seek out a hay mixture that includes orchard grass, blue grass, timothy grass, and alfalfa. It is best to have hay available at all times for your chinchilla. Make sure to store it in a dry place, though, to avoid mold.

chinchilla-diet-hay
Hay makes up a large part of a chinchilla’s diet. Photo credit: Andrea

Of course, don’t forget water: your chinchilla should always have fresh water available. Choose a suitable water bottle with a metal spout to give them constant access to fresh water. Avoid feeding your chinchilla distilled water, as trace minerals required for good health are absent in distilled water. You should also monitor your chin’s water intake as a sudden increase or decrease could signal health problems.

What Do Chins Eat Besides Hay and Pellets

Many chinchilla owners enjoy feeding their pets treats, but an excess of treats can cause a variety of digestive issues, teeth disease, and obesity. So, how can you ensure that you’re feeding the right treats to your pet to advance your chinchilla’s health, not damage it?

Many pet stores carry nutritious natural treats, which oftentimes are an excellent form of treat to share with your pet; be careful, however, because there are also a number of treats offered in pet stores that are marketed for chinchillas but do not contain the correct ratio of vitamins and nutritional sources and may be high in sugar and fat, which can do severe damage to a chinchilla’s digestive system. Be particularly careful to examine the labels to ensure that there is not an excess of sugar or ingredients such as honey in the treats.

Other natural foods that can be used as treats include mountain ash berries, fruit tree twigs, dried rose hips, dried herbs, and marshmallow root. Chinchillas often enjoy raisins or dried fruits, but should not be offered more than 3-4 raisins a week as these are extremely high in sugar. Try cutting the raisins into multiple pieces to make the treats last longer!

When choosing a treat, avoid grains, treats with high amounts of vitamins and minerals, fruits, oats, and treat sticks. These ingredients can wreak havoc on your pet’s system, putting them at risk for serious illness.

Can Chinchillas Eat Carrots?

Carrots should not be a staple part of your chinchilla’s diet, but they are not toxic to your pet. Stick with feeding carrots like you would feed other “extras,” or treats: extremely sparingly. Any extra foods that throw off the careful nutritional ratios could be damaging to your chin.

You might also want to check out this video of a chin eating a piece of carrot:

Can Chinchillas Eat Apples?

Can chinchillas eat apples? Yes!
Chinchillas should be given apples only sparingly

Apples are also permissible, but keep in mind that an excess of sugar can lead to obesity and fatty liver issues for your chinchilla. Only feed them small amounts of fruit as a treat.

Safe and Unsafe Foods for Chinchillas

Given their sensitive digestive system, a number of foods are toxic to chinchillas and can make them extremely ill. If you’re looking for a creative food to treat your chinchilla with, try carrot, celery, potato, pumpkin, or squash. However, avoid the following foods!

Anything containing animal ingredients—Chinchillas are herbivores, meaning they only consume proteins from plants. Their systems are not designed to eat meat or other animal products.

  • Chocolate – contains theobromine which is toxic to chinchillas
  • Nuts and seeds – it is a common misconception that because chinchillas are herbivores and rodents, it is safe for them to be fed nuts and seeds. However, the high amount of fat, proteins, and oils damages their digestive system. Protein intake of over 20% per day can put your chinchilla at risk for liver damage.
  • Tree bark – not only are a number of different types of wood toxic to chinchillas, but trees are often sprayed with pesticides which can be deadly to your pet.
  • Vegetables – although vegetables seem like they would be healthy for a herbivore, they can cause your chinchilla to bloat. You should avoid the following toxic vegetables in particular: asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, lettuce, peas, rhubarb, and spinach.

With a healthy diet, your pet chinchilla will live a long and happy life. A responsible chinchilla owner should carefully research the different do’s and don’ts of chinchilla care before acquiring their new pet, which will ensure that your pet will be carefully taken care of for the rest of his or her life.

Chinchilla Facts for Kids & Everyone Else

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Listed below are some informative facts that can be used to enhance your knowledge about chinchillas or even help you in your decision to welcome one into the family.

Originally native to the Andes Mountains of South America, chinchillas are members of the rodent family that are found in the wild and often kept as pets as well. For a time, chinchillas were even nearly driven to extinction due to the demand for their extremely soft fur in the fur trade industry. Even today, the numbers of chinchilla in the wild are still critically low.

With their mild, friendly temperaments and preference for being social, these cute little animals make great pets for kids and adults alike.

General Facts about Chinchillas

Chinchillas are typically pretty small, normally weighing in at an average of 1 to 2 pounds. The average chinchilla size is about 9 to 15 inches in length, but their tails add on another 3 to 6 inches of their overall length size.

There are currently two different chinchilla species in existence. One named Chinchilla Chinchilla (yes, you say it twice!) which is typically found in the wild; this species has a shorter tail and ears and a thicker neck and shoulders. The other is named Chinchilla Lanigera; this species is the most commonly known and domesticated.

Chinchillas closely resemble other rodents like guinea pigs and porcupines; chinchillas share the same shortness of forelimbs and longer, thicker back limbs. Chinchillas have very dense, soft fur and long bushy tails. Their fur ranges in a variety of different colors such as gray, beige, tan, black or white. Chinchillas have large, rounded ears and eyes placed on either side of their heads.

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A chinchilla’s long tail. Photo credit: Guérin Nicolas

Even though chinchillas have large, round eyes, their eyesight is still very underdeveloped. Chinchillas use their long whiskers to “see” and feel things around them which allows them to navigate better.

The lifespan of a chinchilla is typically about ten years in the wild and 15 years when kept in captivity, but many chinchillas have been known to live for up to 20 years. The oldest on record lived 28 years and 94 days.

Where Do Chinchillas Live?

The natural habitat of chinchillas is located in the Southern part of South America; the Andes mountains to be exact. Wild chinchillas live in places that reach up to 9,800 to 16,400 feet in elevation. Due to the locations of their natural habitats they can withstand temperatures of up to 23 degrees Fahrenheit; they will, however, suffer from heatstroke and even death in temperatures that reach over 80 Fahrenheit.

Chinchillas in the Wild

As very social animals, chinchillas dislike living alone, thus preferring to live in large colonies of about 100. Wild chinchillas make their homes in small holes and rock crevices on the mountains in which they inhabit.

Chinchillas have many natural predators, including large birds, snakes, felines, skunks, and canines.

Due to their natural habitats being rocky, mountainous areas, chinchillas can jump from very high places; some even reaching about 6 feet. They use their tails to help them balance as they move about their rocky homes.

Because chinchillas are the natural prey of many other animals in the wild, over time they have developed a technique called “fur slip”; not to be confused with regular shedding. Whenever they feel threatened, chinchillas can shed large chunks of their fur, effectively leaving them able to escape their predators. Chinchillas have also been known to spray urine on their attackers as a defensive mechanism.

Chinchillas can also breed all-year-round, running from November to May in the Northern hemisphere and from November to May in the Southern Hemisphere. The gestation period for chinchilla offspring lasts 111 days, which is much longer most animals in the rodent family. Because of the length of the pregnancy, chinchillas are born fully covered in fur, with their eyes open. Most chinchilla litters only consist of 1 to 2 offspring.

Females are typically the more dominant gender, becoming aggressive towards other female chinchillas and often males as well during mating. Female chinchillas are monogamous; meaning they only have one mate throughout their entire lifespan, whereas male chinchillas have been known to have many mates.

Facts About Chinchilla Behavior

Why Do Chinchillas Bark?

Chinchillas communicate with each other using a plethora of different sounds to indicate many different emotions. They bark, chirp, grunt, and squeal.

Barking noises tend to indicate that a chinchilla is feeling threatened or afraid. Chinchillas also make barking noises to warn others of an impending predatory threat.

Heres an example of a chinchilla barking:

 

Their hearing range is very similar to that of a human, though their large ears are still a little more sensitive to loud noises than ours are, they do not hear as well as dogs or cats.

Chinchilla Eating Habits

Chinchillas are technically classified as omnivores as they sometimes (although rarely) eat insects and small bird eggs in the wild. Their usual diet is mainly herbivorous and consists of things like plants, leaves, seeds, and fruits. As pets, a chinchilla’s diet is best limited to good quality grass, hay, and chinchilla pellets.

Like hamsters, mice, and many other rodents chinchillas eat sitting on their haunches, holding their food between their front paws.

They also digest their food twice, after the initial pass through the digestive system, their food is excreted then re-ingested, and the normal digestive process is repeated once more.

Are Chinchillas Nocturnal?

Chinchillas are nocturnal creatures; they prefer to sleep and rest during the daytime and become much more active at night. Because of their preference for sleeping in small holes and crevices, chinchillas have become accustomed to sleeping upside down; they can also sleep on their sides or upright as well.

Do Chinchillas Shed?

Chinchillas have the softest fur of any other land mammal; their fur is very dense which repels many parasites. They grow 50 – 80 hairs out of each individual follicle, unlike humans who only grow 2 – 3.

About every three months or so chinchillas will slowly shed their fur the same way humans shed their hair. It is important to remember that though the amount may seem alarming, chinchillas do have more hair, and thus will lose more of it. The chinchilla shedding period can last, roughly, up to two weeks; after which the chinchillas will grow their hair back, starting at the head then moving back towards the rest of the body.

This type of shedding is different from “fur slip” which is a defensive mechanism.

Can Chinchillas Get Wet?

Chinchillas should not be put in water for any reason. Chinchilla fur is so extremely dense that it takes a very long time to dry it out after getting it wet.

Instead, chinchillas take “dust baths” to help rid their body of dirt and oils. “Dust baths” consist of the chinchilla playfully rolling around in a dry shampoo that effectively cleans them.

 

Here’s a a Chinchilla taking a sand (Dust) bath

 

Facts on Chinchilla Care

Due to they’re mild-mannered, social behavior, they make great pets for older kids and families to have. They are also relatively easy to maintain.

Making sure your chinchilla gets lots of exercises is very important. Chinchillas are very active and need lots of space to run around and play; it is not wise to keep them contained for long periods of time.

They also require lots of toys and objects to chew on to control the overgrowth of their teeth. Like rabbits, chinchillas have teeth that are constantly growing, and if they are not maintained, they can overgrow, making it generally painful for them and sometimes impossible to eat. Getting your chinchilla pumice stones, chew toys, and pieces of safe wood are ideal.

Because of their preference for being social, it may be wise to get two chinchillas instead of one. Chinchillas that live in solitary often become overly attached to their human owners and begin to need constant attention and often become very difficult to deal with.